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Good taste, bad taste? Heres what your habits reveal about your social class

If you've ever changed the radio station when stopped at the traffic lights or pretended to have read George Orwell's 1984, you already have some idea that your cultural tastes betray something deeper about who you are.

New research from the Australian Cultural Fields project — one of the most detailed investigations into how cultural tastes and lifestyles connect with privilege in Australia — sheds light on what that might be.

The findings, to be published later this year, reveal how strongly our cultural tastes — such as the books we read, the music we like, the TV shows we watch, and so on — align with characteristics like class, education, age and gender.

More than that, the research shows that cultural privilege is often passed from generation to generation — a finding with all the more importance at a time of widening class inequality in Australia.

So, are your tastes upper class or working class? Middle-age or teenage? For a light-hearted look at how your cultural ..

If you've ever changed the radio station when stopped at the traffic lights or pretended to have read George Orwell's 1984, you already have some idea that your cultural tastes betray something deeper about who you are.

New research from the Australian Cultural Fields project — one of the most detailed investigations into how cultural tastes and lifestyles connect with privilege in Australia — sheds light on what that might be.

The findings, to be published later this year, reveal how strongly our cultural tastes — such as the books we read, the music we like, the TV shows we watch, and so on — align with characteristics like class, education, age and gender.

More than that, the research shows that cultural privilege is often passed from generation to generation — a finding with all the more importance at a time of widening class inequality in Australia.

So, are your tastes upper class or working class? Middle-age or teenage? For a light-hearted look at how your cultural tastes compare, take our quiz, based on the project's results. (You'll need around 6 minutes.)

And don't worry, your answers are not linked to your identity, nor will they be stored or passed on to anyone else.

This feature isn't available on the ABC app. Tap the link below to go to the quiz on the ABC website.

The quiz contains a fraction of the questions put to a nationally-representative sample of more than 1200 Australians as part of the Australian Cultural Fields project, funded by the Australian Research Council.

The survey asked participants around 200 questions about their tastes and activities in the visual arts, sport, heritage, literature, music and television. It also gathered detailed information about participants' personal characteristics, such as income, occupation, education, housing and assets — even the work and education characteristics of parents and partners.

A team of researchers from Western Sydney University, the University of Queensland, New York University and the University Diego Portales in Santiago, Chile, then calculated how strongly each of these hundreds of variables connected to one another.

Turns out that whether you rock out to Madonna, can't stand Jane Austen or binge watch Grand Designs or Game of Thrones (or have never heard of either) is largely shaped by factors that have nothing to do with how cool you are.

How class and culture fit together

"The strongest drivers in taste are occupation and education," Tony Bennett, project director and research professor in social and cultural theory at Western Sydney University, said.

So, the higher your class, the more "highbrow" your tastes are likely to be.

Chart showing survey responses to the question

The research defines class by the type of work you do. It considers not just the job itself but also things like whether you're self-employed; how much autonomy you have at work; the degree of control you have over others; and how much economic capital you own (for example, if you own a small business or a large corporation or significant property assets).

Class is often, but not always, closely linked to education, the researchers found.

Chart showing survey responses to the question

"By and large, people with postgraduate degrees have the most distinctively high cultural tastes," Professor Bennett said.

"And if you've been to a private school, the chances of your having… higher cultural tastes are much greater than if you've been to a state school."

But class and education doesn't always have the biggest influence on taste. In sport, the most powerful divider is gender; in music, it's age.

"Similarly, in some aspects of television, age can be a more powerful divider than class and education," Professor Bennett said.

Chart showing survey responses to the question

By mapping how our cultural tastes and personal characteristics fit together, the researchers were able to show overlapping patterns in the preferences at the heart of our cultural selves.

"We can't predict exactly what any individual will like or not like," Professor Bennett said. "What we can do is predict the strong likelihood that tastes and social positions will stitch together."

So people who love Tim Winton's books and Monet's art, for example, are more likely to play tennis than rugby league and to listen to classical music than pop. They're also more likely to have postgraduate qualifications and work in management or professional occupations.

Age and gender are also part of the mix. Generally, women tend to have higher cultural tastes than men, and younger people tend to have more cutting-edge, contemporary tastes than older people of the same class, Professor Bennett said.

Chart showing survey responses to the question

The cycle of advantage

The research goes further, revealing not only the connections between class and culture, but also that these connections are reproduced across generations.

How middle class are your tastes?

The researchers found these tastes and characteristics tend to go together:

  • You work in lower management or a professional occupation such as teacher, social worker, nurse, accountant or solicitor
  • You own a lot of books (more than 500)
  • You read Australian novels
  • You like modern art
  • You prefer visiting museums or art galleries than playing organised sport
  • You prefer going to music events than watching television
  • You have a postgraduate degree, probably in the humanities and social sciences

The findings build on the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu's theory that power in society is made up of a combination of three kinds of capital: economic, social and cultural.

Bourdieu argued that people from the upper and middle classes were more likely to grow up in homes where they were exposed to "highbrow" cultural activities and tastes. This familiarity with high culture pays off in the education system by giving people the kinds of cultural capital rewarded in the education system, according to Bourdieu.

This means people from upper and middle-class backgrounds, who are rich in cultural capital, are more likely to go university.

"And if you go to university, you're more likely to get a better job," Professor Bennett said.

"There's a cycle here of reproduction and inheritance here."

Widening class divisions mean these findings are potentially more important now than when Bourdieu first developed these ideas in the 1960s.

Class inequalities have increased dramatically since then, both in Australia and other western societies, Professor Bennett said.

"These class relations are also power relations. The owner of a large enterprise exercises a degree of control over the lives of routine workers, for example, in ways that the reverse is not true."

How working class are your tastes?

The researchers found these tastes and characteristics tend to go together:

  • You work in a routine, lower supervisory or technical job such as machine operator, bus driver, labourer or factory worker
  • You love country music
  • You watch more than five hours of television per week
  • You'd rather watch The Block than Australian Story
  • You're a fan of Eddie McGuire
  • You don't keep books at home or visit art galleries or museums
  • You've never heard of Tim Winton or Jackson Pollock
  • You have high school or incomplete high school qualifications

The patterns connecting culture and privilege operate in much the same way for Australia's multicultural and Indigenous communities as for Australians generally, the research found.

"Indeed, they're often more pronounced," Professor Bennett said.

"The connections between cultural capital, education, and class show that Australia still has a fair way to go before it can truly claim to be a society of the fair go. This is even more true if we take the full complexion of Australia's cultural diversity into account."

In addition to the 1202 respondents in the main sample, the researchers surveyed a further 260 Australians from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, Lebanese, Italian, Indian and Chinese communities. Their analysis found these groups tended to engage more with Australian authors, music, art, celebrities and so on, than with international ones.

The ACF research has its limitations, Professor Bennett cautioned. It doesn't capture Australia's elite — "that very small percentage of the population that exercise significant economic power through their accumulation and inheritance of economic capital", he said.

It also doesn't produce a comprehensive picture of working class tastes and interests because it was designed to analyse what advantage accrues to those with higher cultural capital. "So, we already knew that very, very few people go to opera, but we put it in the questionnaire because it's a sign of distinction," he said.

It's also possible that some respondents could be reluctant to admit to tastes seen as "lowbrow". If we read survey data alongside ratings figures, for example, reality television seems to be "universally disliked but universally watched", Professor Bennett points out.

Nevertheless, the research reveals connections between culture and privilege in Australia that cannot be explained by economic forces alone.

Take just one example: visual art.

"Entry to art galleries is free in Australia but… our research showed that something like 35 per cent of people have never been to an art gallery," Professor Bennett said.

"This clearly isn't because of the cost. Powerful social and cultural barriers make many people, especially from lower class positions, feel that art galleries just aren't meant for them."

Credits

Data and reporting: Inga Ting

Development: Ri Liu and Nathanael Scott

Design and illustrations: Alex Palmer

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Australia

Relive days two and one at the Parkes Elvis Festival in our live blog!

Are you ready to Rock and Roll? Were all shook up this year over the 2019 Parkes Elvis Festival. Theres a program full of non-stop entertainment, competitions, dancing and a lot of black leather, and were going to be following it from the trains, to the Wall of Fame and much more. During each day of the festival the Parkes Champion Post will bring you the best content – if you cant be here in Parkes we will make you feel like you are part of the crowd, and if you are make sure you keep an eye out for your photo and details from the days events. READ MORE Want to know whats coming up next? Find the program below!

Are you ready to Rock and Roll?

Theres a program full of non-stop entertainment, competitions, dancing and a lot of black leather, and were going to be following it from the trains, to the Wall of Fame and much more.

During each day of the festival the Parkes Champion Post will bring you the best content – if you cant be here in Parkes we will make you feel like you are pa..

Are you ready to Rock and Roll? Were all shook up this year over the 2019 Parkes Elvis Festival. Theres a program full of non-stop entertainment, competitions, dancing and a lot of black leather, and were going to be following it from the trains, to the Wall of Fame and much more. During each day of the festival the Parkes Champion Post will bring you the best content – if you cant be here in Parkes we will make you feel like you are part of the crowd, and if you are make sure you keep an eye out for your photo and details from the days events. READ MORE Want to know whats coming up next? Find the program below!

Are you ready to Rock and Roll?

Theres a program full of non-stop entertainment, competitions, dancing and a lot of black leather, and were going to be following it from the trains, to the Wall of Fame and much more.

During each day of the festival the Parkes Champion Post will bring you the best content – if you cant be here in Parkes we will make you feel like you are part of the crowd, and if you are make sure you keep an eye out for your photo and details from the days events.

Want to know whats coming up next? Find the program below!

This story Relive days two and one at the Parkes Elvis Festival in our live blog! first appeared on Parkes Champion-Post.

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Australia

Cotton Australia, irrigators hit back at criticism over fish kill

IRRIGATORS and cotton growers have hit back at suggestions they, in combination with government policy, were somehow responsible for the fish kill that took out as many as a million fish early this week near Menindee Lakes. NSW Irrigators Council chief executive Luke Simpkins and Cotton Australia general manager Michael Murray have both defended their respective organisations water use, while lamenting the fact such a disaster occurred. Both blamed drought for the fish kill. “What has happened is as a result of the drought and no water flowing into the rivers. This drought is a devastating time for all of us. This is not about diversions, but about inflows,” said Mr Simpkins. “Without inflows, blue-green algae events will continue to kill fish. This was predicted in December in an ABC report and algal blooms have killed fish before,” he said. “It should be remembered that irrigation farmers on the Upper Darling have not been allocated any water from the system for 18 months because of ..

IRRIGATORS and cotton growers have hit back at suggestions they, in combination with government policy, were somehow responsible for the fish kill that took out as many as a million fish early this week near Menindee Lakes. NSW Irrigators Council chief executive Luke Simpkins and Cotton Australia general manager Michael Murray have both defended their respective organisations water use, while lamenting the fact such a disaster occurred. Both blamed drought for the fish kill. “What has happened is as a result of the drought and no water flowing into the rivers. This drought is a devastating time for all of us. This is not about diversions, but about inflows,” said Mr Simpkins. “Without inflows, blue-green algae events will continue to kill fish. This was predicted in December in an ABC report and algal blooms have killed fish before,” he said. “It should be remembered that irrigation farmers on the Upper Darling have not been allocated any water from the system for 18 months because of the drought.” He said general security allocations (meaning the percentage of a water licence farmers are able to use) have been at zero per cent in both the Gwydir and Lower Namoi valleys. “The water simply isnt there for anyone. “As we approach the state election in March and the federal election in May, it is understandable that MPs seeking re-election and candidates seeking election will want to raise their profiles by allocating blame. “Ultimately it is their credibility that will evaporate when they seek to deny the existence of the drought and the lack of rainfall/inflows,” said Mr Simpkins. Cotton Australia general manager Michael Murray said cotton growers should not be blamed for this weeks fish kill, nor those last month. “New South Wales is in the grip of a long and devastating drought. This drought is impacting all agricultural sectors, including the cotton industry where this seasons crop is forecast to be at least half of last seasons,” he said.. “On the Barwon-Darling, the impact on cotton production is even more devastating with no cotton being grown in Bourke this season, down from 4000 hectares the year before. “Further upstream at Dirranbandi (home of Cubbie Cotton), just 300 hectares of cotton has been planted, which is 1pc of what can be planted in a very good season. “Cotton Australia is very proud of our industry that produces a quality fibre that is in demand both here at home and around the world, but as an industry we are tired of being the whipping boy for all the problems that are being brought on by this crippling drought. “About 18 months ago, 2000 gigalitres of water was in the Menindee Lakes before the Murray-Darling Basin Authority took the deliberate decision to accelerate releases from Menindee to meet downstream requirements and reduce overall evaporation losses from the lakes. “In hindsight, this was probably a poor decision, but it does highlight the incredibly difficult task of managing flows in a manner that minimise losses, but ensures enough water is available for communities and the environment during extended severe droughts. “Since July 1, 2017, irrigators have extracted just 16 gigalitres out of the Barwon-Darling – an amount that would have evaporated out of Menindee in just 16 days. “Coupled with the extensive drought and the simple fact there has been little to no rain, the release of water from the lakes has exacerbated the conditions leading to these fish deaths,” said Mr Murray. “What this issue highlights is how difficult the management of the Menindee Lakes is.” You can now receive updates straight to your inbox from the Daily Liberal. To make sure you're up to date with all the news, sign up to our free or subscriber only newsletters below:

NSW Irrigators Council chief executive Luke Simpkins and Cotton Australia general manager Michael Murray have both defended their respective organisations water use, while lamenting the fact such a disaster occurred.

Both blamed drought for the fish kill.

“What has happened is as a result of the drought and no water flowing into the rivers. This drought is a devastating time for all of us. This is not about diversions, but about inflows,” said Mr Simpkins.

“Without inflows, blue-green algae events will continue to kill fish. This was predicted in December in an ABC report and algal blooms have killed fish before,” he said.

“It should be remembered that irrigation farmers on the Upper Darling have not been allocated any water from the system for 18 months because of the drought.”

He said general security allocations (meaning the percentage of a water licence farmers are able to use) have been at zero per cent in both the Gwydir and Lower Namoi valleys.

“The water simply isnt there for anyone.

“As we approach the state election in March and the federal election in May, it is understandable that MPs seeking re-election and candidates seeking election will want to raise their profiles by allocating blame.

“Ultimately it is their credibility that will evaporate when they seek to deny the existence of the drought and the lack of rainfall/inflows,” said Mr Simpkins.

Cotton Australia general manager Michael Murray said cotton growers should not be blamed for this weeks fish kill, nor those last month.

“New South Wales is in the grip of a long and devastating drought. This drought is impacting all agricultural sectors, including the cotton industry where this seasons crop is forecast to be at least half of last seasons,” he said..

“On the Barwon-Darling, the impact on cotton production is even more devastating with no cotton being grown in Bourke this season, down from 4000 hectares the year before.

“Further upstream at Dirranbandi (home of Cubbie Cotton), just 300 hectares of cotton has been planted, which is 1pc of what can be planted in a very good season.

“Cotton Australia is very proud of our industry that produces a quality fibre that is in demand both here at home and around the world, but as an industry we are tired of being the whipping boy for all the problems that are being brought on by this crippling drought.

“About 18 months ago, 2000 gigalitres of water was in the Menindee Lakes before the Murray-Darling Basin Authority took the deliberate decision to accelerate releases from Menindee to meet downstream requirements and reduce overall evaporation losses from the lakes.

“In hindsight, this was probably a poor decision, but it does highlight the incredibly difficult task of managing flows in a manner that minimise losses, but ensures enough water is available for communities and the environment during extended severe droughts.

“Since July 1, 2017, irrigators have extracted just 16 gigalitres out of the Barwon-Darling – an amount that would have evaporated out of Menindee in just 16 days.

“Coupled with the extensive drought and the simple fact there has been little to no rain, the release of water from the lakes has exacerbated the conditions leading to these fish deaths,” said Mr Murray.

“What this issue highlights is how difficult the management of the Menindee Lakes is.”

Would you like more Dubbo and regional news?

You can now receive updates straight to your inbox from the Daily Liberal. To make sure you're up to date with all the news, sign up to our free or subscriber only newsletters below:

This story Cotton Australia, irrigators hit back at criticism over fish kill first appeared on Daily Liberal.

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Australia

Marise Payne declines to put timeframe on Rahaf Alqunun’s asylum claim

Marise Payne has declined to put a timeframe on how soon Australian authorities will be able to reach a decision on whether to offer asylum to Saudi teenager Rahaf Alqunun.

Key points:

The Foreign Minister said Australia was accessing Rahaf Alqunun's claim for asylum
Ms Payne said there were “a number of steps” still to be taken in the assessment process
She said she had also spoken to Thai government officials about the detention of Hakeem AlAraibi

The Minister for Foreign Affairs, who was speaking in Thailand after talks with Thai Government officials, said Australia was engaged in the process of assessing Ms Alqunun's claim for asylum.

But she stopped short of saying how long the claim would take to be processed.

“There are, as I have just said, a number of steps in the process, including in terms of that assessment,” Ms Payne said.

“They are required to be taken and they will be completed within due course and then that matter will be resolved.”

The Department o..

Marise Payne has declined to put a timeframe on how soon Australian authorities will be able to reach a decision on whether to offer asylum to Saudi teenager Rahaf Alqunun.

Key points:

  • The Foreign Minister said Australia was accessing Rahaf Alqunun's claim for asylum
  • Ms Payne said there were "a number of steps" still to be taken in the assessment process
  • She said she had also spoken to Thai government officials about the detention of Hakeem AlAraibi

The Minister for Foreign Affairs, who was speaking in Thailand after talks with Thai Government officials, said Australia was engaged in the process of assessing Ms Alqunun's claim for asylum.

But she stopped short of saying how long the claim would take to be processed.

"There are, as I have just said, a number of steps in the process, including in terms of that assessment," Ms Payne said.

"They are required to be taken and they will be completed within due course and then that matter will be resolved."

The Department of Home Affairs confirmed on Wednesday that the United Nations refugee agency had referred Ms Alqunun's case to Australia for consideration.

Ms Alqunun's asylum application was fast-tracked, partly because of security concerns, after the young woman's father and brother arrived in Bangkok and asked Thai police to see her.

Ms Alqunun, 18, flew into Thailand from Kuwait on the weekend, saying she had a ticket onwards to Australia where she had hoped to seek asylum over fears her family would kill her for renouncing Islam.

But when she arrived in Bangkok she said a Saudi diplomat met her at the airport and tricked her into handing over her passport and ticket, saying he would secure a visa.

The teenager then barricaded herself inside her room at an airport hotel, and requested to speak to the United Nations refugee office.

Ms Payne said she had also spoken to Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister about the detention of Hakeen AlAraibi, and his possible return to Bahrain.

She said Mr AlAraibi had been visited by officials from the Australian embassy on a number of occasions and the Australian Government was engaging with his legal team.

"We are, as I've said, very concerned about his detention, very concerned about any potential for return of Mr Araibi to Bahrain," she said.

"I have reiterated those concerns to both ministers."

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