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Armistice Centenary: More stories about loved ones

From Anthony Estick, Harbury, UK

Who served: Gilbert Estick and Sydney Estick

My discovery of Gilbert Estick and Sydney Estick of Crystal Brook.

I was unaware of having any relation who fought in either the First or Second wars, until late last year. I had a letter from The Royal British Legion asking me to remember a particular serviceman they had selected for me – Lance Corporal Sydney William Estick, who died in May 1918.

A relation unknown to me until fairly recently, and who has done quite extensive research into the family, sent me information about Charles Estick and Sarah Williamson, who in February 1862 sailed from Plymouth to Freemantle in Australia. They had a family of six, of which Charles was born 1872.

Charles was the father of Gilbert and Sydney. Gilbert survived The Great War and lived till 1957, but Sydney who enlisted as a 21-year-old died one year later in 1918.

Sydney Estick lies in La Kreule Military Cemetery, Hazebrouck, France. I made the trip to La Kreul..

From Anthony Estick, Harbury, UK

Who served: Gilbert Estick and Sydney Estick

My discovery of Gilbert Estick and Sydney Estick of Crystal Brook.

I was unaware of having any relation who fought in either the First or Second wars, until late last year. I had a letter from The Royal British Legion asking me to remember a particular serviceman they had selected for me – Lance Corporal Sydney William Estick, who died in May 1918.

A relation unknown to me until fairly recently, and who has done quite extensive research into the family, sent me information about Charles Estick and Sarah Williamson, who in February 1862 sailed from Plymouth to Freemantle in Australia. They had a family of six, of which Charles was born 1872.

Charles was the father of Gilbert and Sydney. Gilbert survived The Great War and lived till 1957, but Sydney who enlisted as a 21-year-old died one year later in 1918.

Sydney Estick lies in La Kreule Military Cemetery, Hazebrouck, France. I made the trip to La Kreule Cemetery to see his resting place, it is a beautiful and very moving place.

I thank him for his sacrifice that 100 years ago and my thoughts are with any of the family that may still be in South Australia.

Memory: Gilbert Victor Estick.

From Michael Ryan

Who served: Private Thomas Ryan

My uncle was Private Thomas Ryan, O/N 5201. Unit: 14th Bn. AIF. He died of wounds on February 5, 1917, aged 20 near Bapaume, France.

Thomas is the son of Thomas Nicholas and Mary Jane Ryan of Casterton, Victoria. He was born at Bahgallah, Victoria.

The following article about Thomas Ryan was written in the Casterton Free Press and Glenelg Shire Advertiser on Thursday June 7, 1917.

Killed While Rescuing A Comrade – A Heros Death

Soldier “Watty” Norris, at the front, has written a letter to Mrs Ryan (says our Sandlford correspondent in sympathetic allusion to the death of her son [Thomas], which occurred near to where the writer was in action at the time). He recounts the circumstances as follows:

“Tom lost his life while carrying out the duties of stretcher bearer under a most terrible artillery fire. I never saw him after we got into the line, but I was told by other stretcher bearers that he was hit by a shrapnel burst, the metal hitting him in three places on head and shoulders. He was wounded some time in the night and died next morning at the first dressing station on the field. It was a night never to be forgotten, nothing but bursts of flame and smoke all along the line. We went in about 200 strong and came out about 70. We were supporting an attack right in front of Bapaume.”

The writer makes the following solacing remarks in the course of the letter.

“It will be a great consolation for you to know that Tom lost his life while gallantly carrying out the duties of stretcher bearer under a most terrible artillery fire. Try to bear up under the terrible blow and think of him as a hero who has given his life so gallantly, attempting to rescue his wounded comrades. Although overwhelmed with grief, I am sure you will be proud to know that you had a son to go forth in this greatest of all wars and sacrifice his life in such a noble manner.”

Thomas Ryan memorial is at the Bernafay Wood British Cemetery, Montauban. France.

From Nick Goddard, Killara

Armistice in Paris: Herbert Goddard

Armistice in Paris: Herbert Goddard

Herbert Goddard

Personal account of being in Paris on 11/11/18 written by my Grandfather, Herbert Goddard 7-33rd Btln

Armistice night in Paris.

Being the only Forbesite in Paris when the memorable news was received that the armistice had been signed, I will give a few impressions of how it was received in the great French capital. For some days before while the terms were being transmitted to the enemy government there was an air of expectancy that before long hostilities would cease, and it was noticeable that a great number of the business establishments were doing a good trade in flags and bunting.

The signing of the armistice was announced to Paris soon after 11 oclock in the morning by a salvo of five guns from the forts, and in the twinkling of an eye the entire aspect of the city changed. The incubus of four years war fell from the shoulders of the capital like a discarded cloak. Flags appeared from everywhere and the roadway was taken possession of by triumphant processions of men, women and children carrying the banners of all the Allies and singing “The Marseillaise”, “God save the King” and “The Brabanconne”. Paris without hesitation decided to do no more work for the day, and many of the business houses closed their doors. It was a great and glorious crowd of humanity which surged along the grand boulevards. Everyone in khaki was enthusiastically cheered, and the whole-hearted manner in which the civilians grasped you by the hand, uttering a few words, showed the respect and honour they felt towards the man in uniform. It was soon apparent that the host of city workers intended to give up the day to rejoicing.

It was the night, however, which for anyone to have witnessed, will forever live in their memory. Arc lamps and signs which had not been used for four years shone forth and the crowd stimulated even more by the artificial light which had been denied them gave vent to all the feelings which the emotions of the day suggested. Cheering echoed and re-echoed through the streets and there was great rejoicing on all hands. Soldiers and civilians embraced to an extent that probably Paris had never before witnessed. French and other allied officers arm in arm with singing girls, yanks, poilus and “diggers” bearing flags of all nationalities, were jostled, pushing, and there is no harm in saying it, kissed and cuddled as they had never been before. It was indeed the sight of a lifetime. The crowd took possession of taxicabs, lorries, or any other vehicles happening along. They climbed on to the roofs, clung to the footboards, and bestrided the bonnets. Much amusement was even caused by dragging some of the big 5.9 guns which were on exhibition at the Concorde along the Boulevards crowded all over with a happy joyous throng.

There were many soul-stirring scenes a the Place de IOpera – it was just black with people and all the good old patriotic songs of France, England and America were sung and re-sung.

It was previously arranged that if the armistice was signed that day all the “Aussies” in Paris would congregate at the Follies Bergere theatre where “Zig Zag” was holding sway. No doubt it was the “Aussies” night out – not matter from where any flag might be hoisted it was not long before an “Aussie” flag found even a higher point of vantage. When Daphne Pollen, one of the chief artists, appeared on the stage wearing one of our felt hats, with our flag and badge in her dress, and commenced to coo-ee, needless to say our boys showed their full appreciation. At half-time the “diggers” simply took possession of the stage and gave to good effect some of their favourite old songs, and in particular “Australia will be there” rang out all over the spacious theatre. Meanwhile, some ingenious “Aussie” had tacked up a few well worded posters around the promenade such as “Say, digger, whos your lady friend”, “Long life to the allied soldiers, beaucoup long life to the Aussies” which caused a good deal of amusement.

To be in Paris just at this time was an event of a lifetime and shall never be forgotten by those who took part in the festivities.

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Relive days two and one at the Parkes Elvis Festival in our live blog!

Are you ready to Rock and Roll? Were all shook up this year over the 2019 Parkes Elvis Festival. Theres a program full of non-stop entertainment, competitions, dancing and a lot of black leather, and were going to be following it from the trains, to the Wall of Fame and much more. During each day of the festival the Parkes Champion Post will bring you the best content – if you cant be here in Parkes we will make you feel like you are part of the crowd, and if you are make sure you keep an eye out for your photo and details from the days events. READ MORE Want to know whats coming up next? Find the program below!

Are you ready to Rock and Roll?

Theres a program full of non-stop entertainment, competitions, dancing and a lot of black leather, and were going to be following it from the trains, to the Wall of Fame and much more.

During each day of the festival the Parkes Champion Post will bring you the best content – if you cant be here in Parkes we will make you feel like you are pa..

Are you ready to Rock and Roll? Were all shook up this year over the 2019 Parkes Elvis Festival. Theres a program full of non-stop entertainment, competitions, dancing and a lot of black leather, and were going to be following it from the trains, to the Wall of Fame and much more. During each day of the festival the Parkes Champion Post will bring you the best content – if you cant be here in Parkes we will make you feel like you are part of the crowd, and if you are make sure you keep an eye out for your photo and details from the days events. READ MORE Want to know whats coming up next? Find the program below!

Are you ready to Rock and Roll?

Theres a program full of non-stop entertainment, competitions, dancing and a lot of black leather, and were going to be following it from the trains, to the Wall of Fame and much more.

During each day of the festival the Parkes Champion Post will bring you the best content – if you cant be here in Parkes we will make you feel like you are part of the crowd, and if you are make sure you keep an eye out for your photo and details from the days events.

Want to know whats coming up next? Find the program below!

This story Relive days two and one at the Parkes Elvis Festival in our live blog! first appeared on Parkes Champion-Post.

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Australia

Cotton Australia, irrigators hit back at criticism over fish kill

IRRIGATORS and cotton growers have hit back at suggestions they, in combination with government policy, were somehow responsible for the fish kill that took out as many as a million fish early this week near Menindee Lakes. NSW Irrigators Council chief executive Luke Simpkins and Cotton Australia general manager Michael Murray have both defended their respective organisations water use, while lamenting the fact such a disaster occurred. Both blamed drought for the fish kill. “What has happened is as a result of the drought and no water flowing into the rivers. This drought is a devastating time for all of us. This is not about diversions, but about inflows,” said Mr Simpkins. “Without inflows, blue-green algae events will continue to kill fish. This was predicted in December in an ABC report and algal blooms have killed fish before,” he said. “It should be remembered that irrigation farmers on the Upper Darling have not been allocated any water from the system for 18 months because of ..

IRRIGATORS and cotton growers have hit back at suggestions they, in combination with government policy, were somehow responsible for the fish kill that took out as many as a million fish early this week near Menindee Lakes. NSW Irrigators Council chief executive Luke Simpkins and Cotton Australia general manager Michael Murray have both defended their respective organisations water use, while lamenting the fact such a disaster occurred. Both blamed drought for the fish kill. “What has happened is as a result of the drought and no water flowing into the rivers. This drought is a devastating time for all of us. This is not about diversions, but about inflows,” said Mr Simpkins. “Without inflows, blue-green algae events will continue to kill fish. This was predicted in December in an ABC report and algal blooms have killed fish before,” he said. “It should be remembered that irrigation farmers on the Upper Darling have not been allocated any water from the system for 18 months because of the drought.” He said general security allocations (meaning the percentage of a water licence farmers are able to use) have been at zero per cent in both the Gwydir and Lower Namoi valleys. “The water simply isnt there for anyone. “As we approach the state election in March and the federal election in May, it is understandable that MPs seeking re-election and candidates seeking election will want to raise their profiles by allocating blame. “Ultimately it is their credibility that will evaporate when they seek to deny the existence of the drought and the lack of rainfall/inflows,” said Mr Simpkins. Cotton Australia general manager Michael Murray said cotton growers should not be blamed for this weeks fish kill, nor those last month. “New South Wales is in the grip of a long and devastating drought. This drought is impacting all agricultural sectors, including the cotton industry where this seasons crop is forecast to be at least half of last seasons,” he said.. “On the Barwon-Darling, the impact on cotton production is even more devastating with no cotton being grown in Bourke this season, down from 4000 hectares the year before. “Further upstream at Dirranbandi (home of Cubbie Cotton), just 300 hectares of cotton has been planted, which is 1pc of what can be planted in a very good season. “Cotton Australia is very proud of our industry that produces a quality fibre that is in demand both here at home and around the world, but as an industry we are tired of being the whipping boy for all the problems that are being brought on by this crippling drought. “About 18 months ago, 2000 gigalitres of water was in the Menindee Lakes before the Murray-Darling Basin Authority took the deliberate decision to accelerate releases from Menindee to meet downstream requirements and reduce overall evaporation losses from the lakes. “In hindsight, this was probably a poor decision, but it does highlight the incredibly difficult task of managing flows in a manner that minimise losses, but ensures enough water is available for communities and the environment during extended severe droughts. “Since July 1, 2017, irrigators have extracted just 16 gigalitres out of the Barwon-Darling – an amount that would have evaporated out of Menindee in just 16 days. “Coupled with the extensive drought and the simple fact there has been little to no rain, the release of water from the lakes has exacerbated the conditions leading to these fish deaths,” said Mr Murray. “What this issue highlights is how difficult the management of the Menindee Lakes is.” You can now receive updates straight to your inbox from the Daily Liberal. To make sure you're up to date with all the news, sign up to our free or subscriber only newsletters below:

NSW Irrigators Council chief executive Luke Simpkins and Cotton Australia general manager Michael Murray have both defended their respective organisations water use, while lamenting the fact such a disaster occurred.

Both blamed drought for the fish kill.

“What has happened is as a result of the drought and no water flowing into the rivers. This drought is a devastating time for all of us. This is not about diversions, but about inflows,” said Mr Simpkins.

“Without inflows, blue-green algae events will continue to kill fish. This was predicted in December in an ABC report and algal blooms have killed fish before,” he said.

“It should be remembered that irrigation farmers on the Upper Darling have not been allocated any water from the system for 18 months because of the drought.”

He said general security allocations (meaning the percentage of a water licence farmers are able to use) have been at zero per cent in both the Gwydir and Lower Namoi valleys.

“The water simply isnt there for anyone.

“As we approach the state election in March and the federal election in May, it is understandable that MPs seeking re-election and candidates seeking election will want to raise their profiles by allocating blame.

“Ultimately it is their credibility that will evaporate when they seek to deny the existence of the drought and the lack of rainfall/inflows,” said Mr Simpkins.

Cotton Australia general manager Michael Murray said cotton growers should not be blamed for this weeks fish kill, nor those last month.

“New South Wales is in the grip of a long and devastating drought. This drought is impacting all agricultural sectors, including the cotton industry where this seasons crop is forecast to be at least half of last seasons,” he said..

“On the Barwon-Darling, the impact on cotton production is even more devastating with no cotton being grown in Bourke this season, down from 4000 hectares the year before.

“Further upstream at Dirranbandi (home of Cubbie Cotton), just 300 hectares of cotton has been planted, which is 1pc of what can be planted in a very good season.

“Cotton Australia is very proud of our industry that produces a quality fibre that is in demand both here at home and around the world, but as an industry we are tired of being the whipping boy for all the problems that are being brought on by this crippling drought.

“About 18 months ago, 2000 gigalitres of water was in the Menindee Lakes before the Murray-Darling Basin Authority took the deliberate decision to accelerate releases from Menindee to meet downstream requirements and reduce overall evaporation losses from the lakes.

“In hindsight, this was probably a poor decision, but it does highlight the incredibly difficult task of managing flows in a manner that minimise losses, but ensures enough water is available for communities and the environment during extended severe droughts.

“Since July 1, 2017, irrigators have extracted just 16 gigalitres out of the Barwon-Darling – an amount that would have evaporated out of Menindee in just 16 days.

“Coupled with the extensive drought and the simple fact there has been little to no rain, the release of water from the lakes has exacerbated the conditions leading to these fish deaths,” said Mr Murray.

“What this issue highlights is how difficult the management of the Menindee Lakes is.”

Would you like more Dubbo and regional news?

You can now receive updates straight to your inbox from the Daily Liberal. To make sure you're up to date with all the news, sign up to our free or subscriber only newsletters below:

This story Cotton Australia, irrigators hit back at criticism over fish kill first appeared on Daily Liberal.

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Marise Payne declines to put timeframe on Rahaf Alqunun’s asylum claim

Marise Payne has declined to put a timeframe on how soon Australian authorities will be able to reach a decision on whether to offer asylum to Saudi teenager Rahaf Alqunun.

Key points:

The Foreign Minister said Australia was accessing Rahaf Alqunun's claim for asylum
Ms Payne said there were “a number of steps” still to be taken in the assessment process
She said she had also spoken to Thai government officials about the detention of Hakeem AlAraibi

The Minister for Foreign Affairs, who was speaking in Thailand after talks with Thai Government officials, said Australia was engaged in the process of assessing Ms Alqunun's claim for asylum.

But she stopped short of saying how long the claim would take to be processed.

“There are, as I have just said, a number of steps in the process, including in terms of that assessment,” Ms Payne said.

“They are required to be taken and they will be completed within due course and then that matter will be resolved.”

The Department o..

Marise Payne has declined to put a timeframe on how soon Australian authorities will be able to reach a decision on whether to offer asylum to Saudi teenager Rahaf Alqunun.

Key points:

  • The Foreign Minister said Australia was accessing Rahaf Alqunun's claim for asylum
  • Ms Payne said there were "a number of steps" still to be taken in the assessment process
  • She said she had also spoken to Thai government officials about the detention of Hakeem AlAraibi

The Minister for Foreign Affairs, who was speaking in Thailand after talks with Thai Government officials, said Australia was engaged in the process of assessing Ms Alqunun's claim for asylum.

But she stopped short of saying how long the claim would take to be processed.

"There are, as I have just said, a number of steps in the process, including in terms of that assessment," Ms Payne said.

"They are required to be taken and they will be completed within due course and then that matter will be resolved."

The Department of Home Affairs confirmed on Wednesday that the United Nations refugee agency had referred Ms Alqunun's case to Australia for consideration.

Ms Alqunun's asylum application was fast-tracked, partly because of security concerns, after the young woman's father and brother arrived in Bangkok and asked Thai police to see her.

Ms Alqunun, 18, flew into Thailand from Kuwait on the weekend, saying she had a ticket onwards to Australia where she had hoped to seek asylum over fears her family would kill her for renouncing Islam.

But when she arrived in Bangkok she said a Saudi diplomat met her at the airport and tricked her into handing over her passport and ticket, saying he would secure a visa.

The teenager then barricaded herself inside her room at an airport hotel, and requested to speak to the United Nations refugee office.

Ms Payne said she had also spoken to Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister about the detention of Hakeen AlAraibi, and his possible return to Bahrain.

She said Mr AlAraibi had been visited by officials from the Australian embassy on a number of occasions and the Australian Government was engaging with his legal team.

"We are, as I've said, very concerned about his detention, very concerned about any potential for return of Mr Araibi to Bahrain," she said.

"I have reiterated those concerns to both ministers."

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