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Tales from the Rosebank as distillery returns

A Scots distillery which was mothballed for a quarter of a century is closer to its return as work c..

A Scots distillery which was mothballed for a quarter of a century is closer to its return as work continues to restore the Rosebank Distillery in Falkirk.

For over 150 years Rosebank produced malt whisky by the banks of the Forth & Clyde canal.

But it looked like end end when the lowland distillery closed in 1993 and talk of rescue plans soon came to nothing.
However, Rosebank is to be reborn after it was bought last autumn by Ian Macleod Distillers.

The independent, family-run whisky firm, which also owns Tamdhu and Glengoyne, is determined to restore Rosebank to its former glory, and rebuild the distillery right down to the last rivet in its stills.

A spokesman said: While there are tales of remote Highland distilleries surviving after long periods of silence, there is far more pressure on land in the Lowlands. One can just imagine the developers eyeing up the derelict site and licking their lips in anticipation.

Well, against all the odds Rosebank survived in one piece, allowing it to be rescued along with the few remaining casks of single malt in the warehouse. It is now in good hands with family-owned, independent Ian Macleod Distillers. Its new owners are committed to the pursuit of restoring Rosebank to what it used to be – the undisputed “King of the Lowlands”.

Technically, Rosebank was mothballed for better times ahead, but as the years passed, any hope of re-opening began to fade.

In 2002 the site was sold to British Waterways who owned the Forth & Clyde canal and the old maltings were converted into flats.

Six years later, in what seemed to be the final death knell, thieves broke in and stole the three pot stills and the mash tun.

This was where the new owners stepped in and rescued it in the nick of time before it could be bulldozed into history.
Ian Macleod Distillers MD Leonard Russell said: It needs a lot of tender loving care to bring it back to its former glory, so were going to have to rebuild some of the site from scratch.

The new owners have vowed to restore this triple-distilled gem of a distillery as best they can in a world that has moved on 25 years.

Find out more HERE.

The post Tales from the Rosebank as distillery returns appeared first on Scottish Field.

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Food

Why do onions make you cry?

Im not crying, Im just cutting onions (Picture: Getty)
Have you ever been chopping onions and ended ..

Im not crying, Im just cutting onions (Picture: Getty)

Have you ever been chopping onions and ended up looking like youd just watched The Notebook for the first time? Yup, us too.

Onions have the power to make us cry more than any of our exes ever could, which is pretty annoying given we cant ghost and block a vegetable.

There are a whole host of methods to avoid the tears when cooking with onions, but have you never just wondered why theyre so sob-inducing in the first place?

We have some answers for you.

Hate to break it to you lady, but you havent even started chopping yet (Picture: Getty)

The tears you cry when youre chopping onions are reflex tears, which are brought about by some sort of external irritant.

You also have basal tears which are around all the time and act as eye lube, and emotional tears which are around when someone calls you a mean name or you see the John Lewis advert.

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Reflex tears are released from the lachrymal glands, which receive signals from your brain to do so if your eyes need to be flushed out due to things like dust or smoke.

As you chop your onion, an enzyme is released, which in the air becomes a compound called syn-propanethial-S-oxide.

This is the mix that sets off your lachrymal glands, as your body tries to protect itself from the oncoming chemical attack.

Apparently you can build up something of a tolerance to syn-propanethial-S-oxide, but theres no official timescale so you just have to endure the pain of cooking until it lessens.

In the meantime, this year brought a tear-free onion to our stores, so you could always just try that instead.

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Food

Kelloggs launches beer made from leftover Corn Flakes to reduce food waste

(Picture: KelloggsUK/Getty)
Kelloggs will release a beer made from leftover Corn Flakes.

The beer i..

(Picture: KelloggsUK/Getty)

Kelloggs will release a beer made from leftover Corn Flakes.

The beer is being made to lessen the environmental impact of food waste, to ensure that customers no longer worry about what happens to leftover food.

The Throw Away IPA is made by Seven Brothers Brewery in Manchester. It uses upcycled cornflakes which are too big, small or overcooked to sell in a box of cereal, as a proportion of the wheat grain which goes into the beer.

The cornflakes actually sweeten the taste of the beer.

Kellogg's beer
(Picture: KelloggsUK)

The beer is the same colour as cornflakes, and is helping food distribution charity FareShare, as 10p from each can will be donated to the cause.

Corporate social responsibility manager for Kelloggs UK, Kate Prince, said: Kelloggs is always exploring different and sustainable ways to reduce food waste in its factories. So it is great to be involved in such a fun initiative with a local supplier.

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Kelloggs is working hard to eliminate food waste in our manufacturing processes and give our consumers the wholesome products they love with minimum impact on the planet. Our approach has delivered a 12.5% reduction on food waste in our UK sites this year.

Kelloggs beer
(Picture: KelloggsUK)

Alison Watson, from Seven Brothers Brewery in Salford, added: Seven Brothers Brewery is delighted to be working with Kelloggs on a project which uses edible but not-sellable cereal.

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Kelloggs recognises that it has an important role to play in reducing food waste, and that includes finding uses for edible food that doesnt make it into the cereal box. The cereal is perfectly safe to eat but the flakes might be too big, too small or broken so not good enough for our packs.

We plan to create three beers including a Hoppy IPA which will be launched this month and sold in our Ancoats bar and the Dockyard, MediaCityUK.

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Food

McDonalds is selling chicken nugget Christmas decorations

(Picture: McDonalds)
Its December, and so finally its time for McDonalds to release its Christmas de..

(Picture: McDonalds)

Its December, and so finally its time for McDonalds to release its Christmas decorations.

The fast food chain has launched a number of chicken nugget themed decorations, and we cant wait to hang them on our trees.

The chicken nugget bauble comes with glitter and a Santa hat, and was designed by BombKi1, the designer who makes baubles for Fortnum & Mason.

McDonald's Is Selling Chicken Nugget Christmas Decorations
(Picture: McDonalds)

There are also chicken nugget fairy lights, made up of a string of McNuggets with golden arches to ensure your tree looks like it was made at McDonalds.

Ben Fox, marketing director at McDonalds, said: Our new Reindeer Ready campaign aims to remind customers that we are there when they need us at this time of year – from a Christmas shopping coffee break to a pre-party burger or even a mid-present delivery carrot stop.

More: Christmas

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If you havent already put your Christmas tree up, and you love a McDonalds, you know what to do.

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