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Guinea: Violence During Referendum

(Nairobi) – Guineas security forces violently cracked down on opposition supporters in the lead up t..

(Nairobi) – Guineas security forces violently cracked down on opposition supporters in the lead up to and during the March 22, 2020 constitutional referendum and legislative elections, Human Rights Watch said today.

Security forces have killed at least eight people, including two children, and wounded over 20 others. Since mid-February, security forces have also arrested scores of suspected opposition supporters, and forcibly disappeared at least 40. Government officials said protesters injured at least nine members of the security forces, vandalized polling stations, burned election materials, and threatened voters on election day. On March 22, armed soldiers, gendarmes, and police officers in pickup vehicles and on foot deployed across Guineas capital, Conakry, fired teargas and live rounds on protesters, killing at least six people, including one woman, and injuring at least eight men.

“Guinean security forces have confronted popular protests with brutal violence,” said Ilaria Allegrozzi, senior West Africa researcher at Human Rights Watch. “With protests likely to continue in the lead-up to elections, the Guinean government should immediately rein in the security forces, and opposition leaders should do what they can to help stop abuses.”

At the heart of the protests is President Alpha Condés perceived plan to run for a third presidential term in elections scheduled for later in 2020. In December 2019, Condé, 81, released the text for the proposed new constitution, which his supporters and opponents said would pave the way for his third term agenda. A coalition of civil society groups, labor unions, and political parties has organized regular protests since mid-2019 and boycotted the referendum. On March 27, 2020, Guineas electoral commission announced that the proposed new constitution passed with over 90 percent of the vote.

Human Rights Watch interviewed 60 victims, family members, and witnesses, as well as 15 medical workers, journalists, lawyers, opposition party members, and civil society representatives. Human Rights Watch analyzed photographs and video footage to corroborate victim and witness accounts. Human Rights Watch contacted Albert Damatang Camara, the security and civilian protection minister, by phone and WhatsApp and shared its findings via email on March 23, requesting responses to specific questions. Camara has not replied.

Several witnesses said that on March 22, security forces were at times accompanied by persons in plain clothes wielding knives and machetes who attacked protesters, killing at least one young man, Diallo Nassouralaye. Some opposition supporters threw stones and other projectiles at security forces. Violence also erupted outside the capital, including in Kindia, northeast of Conakry; Kolaboui; and Sangaredi, in the west; and Nzérékoré, in southeastern Guinea.

A witness said that a gendarme shot Issa Yero Diallo, a 28-year-old woman in Conakrys Ansoumanyah Plateau neighborhood at close range: “The gendarme threatened the woman before shooting her. People around tried to dissuade him, but he shot her in the neck.” Residents said the woman was targeted because she had helped negotiate the release of a man whom gendarmes arrested earlier that day. Minister Camara told the media the following day that a gendarme suspected of killing the woman had been arrested.

Security forces killed two teenage boys, one on February 20 and one on March 5, and on March 6 arrested two prominent opposition members in Conakry. On February 11 and 12, security forces arbitrarily arrested 40 people, including at least two children and three men with intellectual disabilities, during raids in Conakry and took them to a military base about 700 kilometers away in Soronkoni, in eastern Guinea. They were held without any contact with the outside world and without the authorities acknowledging their detention until March 28, when the authorities released 36 and transferred 4 others to Conakry central prison where they remain.

Minister Camara said in a news release on March 22 that the referendum “took place in peaceful conditions throughout the territory,” but that “certain activists have tried to sow terror” in Conakry and other cities and towns.” In a media interview on March 31, he confirmed that six people died in Conakry on March 22, including one due to stroke, and said that the authorities had opened investigations.

With more protests expected in the lead-up to elections later this year, Guinean authorities should instruct security forces to exercise restraint and abide by the Guidelines for the Policing of Assemblies by Law Enforcement Officials in Africa of the African Commission on Human and Peoples Rights (ACHPR), and the United Nations Basic Principles on the Use of Force and Firearms by Law Enforcement Officials. Under these principles, law enforcement officers may use force only when strictly necessary and to the extent required to achieve a legitimate policing objective.

The ACHPR, the Special Representative of the UN Office for West Africa and the Sahel, the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), the European Union, France, and the United States all condemned or expressed concern about violence around the referendum. On March 4, the ACHPR special rapporteur for Guinea called on the government to comply with the African Charter on Human and Peoples Rights and to ensure free, fair, and transparent elections. In a February 11 resolution, the European Parliament expressed concern over the rising political tensions and violence in Guinea.

Guineas international partners and other institutions, particularly the African Union, ECOWAS, the UN Security Council, the EU, and the US should increase pressure on President Condé and his government and press for credible investigations and prosecutions of recent violations, Human Rights Watch said.

If Guinean authorities fail to address these human rights concerns, the US should consider imposing targeted sanctions against senior Guinean officials responsible for ongoing human rights abuses, including travel bans and asset freezes.

The EU and its member states should consider the existing sanctions regime on Guinea and remind Guineas authorities of the consequences for failure to address serious human rights concerns.

“Strong action is needed now before the situation deteriorates further and disproportionate force is used against protesters in the lead-up to elections,” Allegrozzi said. “Guineas partners should signal clearly that there will be consequences for firing on protesters or disappearing opposition supporters.”

Debates to replace Guineas 2010 constitution began in early 2019, with the ruling party RPG-Arc-en-ciel in May urging citizen support for the proposed constitution. Although the text presented by Condé in December 2019 maintains a two-term limit for presidents, his supporters said it restarts the clock and would therefore allow him to run in 2020. Condé said on February 10, that, if a new constitution is passed, “[his] party will decide” whether he will stand for re-election.

On February 28, Condé rescheduled the constitutional referendum and legislative elections, initially planned for March 1, to March 22. International and regional organizations, including the AU, the International Francophone Organization, and ECOWAS, refused to send monitors to the polls, saying that the voter list lacked credibility.

Since October 2019, a coalition of nongovernmental groups and opposition parties, the National Front for the Defense of the Constitution (Le Front national de la défense de la Constitution, FNDC), has organized widespread protests across Guinea against the constitutional referendum.

Although the government has in some instances permitted protests to go ahead, in most cases the security forces have broken up demonstrations by arresting participants or firing on protesters with teargas and live ammunition. Human Rights Watch previously reported that at least 30 people were killed during protests between October 2019 and January 2020. The FNDC estimates that security forces have killed 44 people since October 2019. Protesters also allegedly killed at least one gendarme during protests in October, according to the government, although protesters say he was shot by another gendarme.

Referendum Day Violence in Conakry, Other Towns

On March 22, 2020, violent confrontations erupted across Conakry, including in Wanindara, Hamdallaye, Coza, Sofonia, Ansoumania, Cimenterie, and Simbaya neighborhoods, between scores of pro- and anti-referendum groups, and between anti-referendum protesters and security forces. Protesters burned tires, built barricades in the streets, and threw stones at the security forces, who responded with teargas and live ammunition. The security minister said that violent demonstrators attacked polling places, threatened voters and burned voting materials, which Human Rights Watch confirmed.

Two witnesses told Human Rights Watch that soldiers, gendarmes, policemen, and people in plain clothes armed with machetes threw stones at a house in the “Petit Simbaya” neighborhood where opposition supporters were known to be living. When 19-year-old Diallo Nassouralaye, who lived next door, went out to check what was happening, security forces shot him. “He was hit in the abdomen,” a witness said. “I took him to a nearby health center, but he died there.” The doctor there said that he was brought in at about 1 p.m. and died 10 minutes later from an abdominal gunshot wound.

Two witnesses said that gendarmes shot dead Thierno Oumar Diallo, a 25-year-old man, during clashes between pro-referendum and opposition supporters in Kakimbo neighborhood at around 3 p.m. A medical source confirmed that the man died from a gunshot wound to the neck. One of the witnesses, a relative of the victim, said:

Gendarmes intervened during the confrontations and fired teargas and live bullets. I was told by witnesses that, in addition to my brother, they killed two other men, and injured four others. My brother died on the spot; he got a bullet in the neck. I took the body a local health center and then to the morgue, but medical staff there refused to accept it. So, I took the body home, and we buried him the next day.

Two witnesses said that gendarmes fired live ammunition during clashes between pro-referendum and opposition supporters in Conakrys Hamdallaye neighborhood, killing Hafiziou Diallo, 28. A relative of the victim saw the killing:

We took [to] the streets to protest against the vote. There were pro-referendum supporters in civilian clothes, armed with knives, and gendarmes. We threw stones at them, and the things turned violent. The gendarmes, about 10 of them, fired teargas and live rounds. People ran away, but my uncle was hit by a bullet and fell down in front of me. The bullet hit him in the chest.

Human Rights Watch reviewed photographs of the body and consulted medical sources who confirmed the witness accounts.

A policeman killed 25-year-old Thierno Hamidou Bah during an opposition demonstration in Kinifi neighborhood, two witnesses told Human Rights Watch. One said:

We were out in the street to say no to the referendum. We were there to show our anger. We threw stones at the police. The police fired at the crowd with live ammunition and shot three people, including my friend, who was hit in the chest and fell in front of me. I brought him to a health center, where he died.

A doctor who saw the body confirmed that the man had been shot in the chest. Human Rights Watch also saw photographs of the wound.

Sporadic violence continued in Conakry on March 23, including in Cosa and Wanindara neighborhoods, where riots were reported, and in Baylobaye, where security forces broke into a home and shot a man. The victims father said: “Three policemen entered my place at 3 p.m. I was there with my wife and son. They accused us of not going to the polls. One of them beat me with his truncheon and stole my phone. My son argued with them and was shot in the arm. I took him to a health center where he underwent surgery to remove the bullet.” Human Rights Watch also spoke to the doctor who treated the mans gunshot wound.

Violence erupted in other cities and towns across Guinea on March 22. Media reported that protesters attacked polling places in Kindia, northeast of Conakry, and in Kolaboui in the west and harassed election staff in Télimélé. Residents and journalists also reported that in Nzérékoré, capital of the Guinée forestière region, election-related incidents resulted in inter-communal and religious clashes between armed members of the Guerze community, who are mostly Christian or animist, and armed ethnic Konianke, who are mostly Muslim, with several people killed and properties burned.

Gendarmes injured a 20-year-old man during an anti-referendum protest in Sangaredi, in western Guinea. A witness and relative of the victim said that gendarmes fired live ammunition at the crowd: “It was 10 a.m. We were out to demonstrate against the vote. The gendarmes attempted to disperse us. Some threw stones at them. I heard at least two gunshots. My brother was hit by a bullet on the shoulder and broke his arm while falling.”

The victim could not be treated in Sangaredi and was taken to Conakry the following day. Human Rights Watch reviewed medical records and spoke to the doctor who treated the man.

Pre-Referendum Violence and Arrests

On March 20, the police fired live ammunition during an opposition-led demonstration in Conakrys Bomboly neighborhood, injuring an 18-year-old man. The victim said:

I was walking to my brothers home when I found myself in the middle of a demonstration. Some of the protesters were violent and confronted the police with stones. The police fired teargas and then shot live ammunition. Everybody ran away. I also ran for safety. I heard four gunshots before finding myself on the ground. I had been shot on the right shoulder.

On March 6, security forces arbitrarily arrested Sekou Koundouno and Ibrahima Diallo, prominent members of the FNDC leadership, at Diallos residence. Diallo said that at least 20 policemen, some of them masked, broke into his home in Conakry at about 7 p.m., arresting them without a warrant. Under Guinean law, a warrant is required unless the person arrested is in flagrante delicto (caught in the act of committing a crime). Diallos wife, who witnessed the arrest, said:

I asked the policemen if they had a warrant. This made them upset. One of them grabbed me by the collar of my shirt and pushed me against a flowerpot. Then they turned the house upside down before arresting my husband and Koundouno, who was taken along half-naked, without his trousers and shoes.

Diallo said that he was blindfolded as soon as he boarded the police vehicle and that he and Koundouno were held at the Judicial Police Headquarters (Direction de la Police Judicaire) in Conakry without access to their lawyers for a week. Investigating judges charged them with “insulting officials” and “harming and threatening public safety and order,” but released them on bail on March 13, pending further inquiries. They were ordered to appear before the judges on a weekly basis.

During protests in Conakry on March 5, two witnesses said security forces including policemen and gendarmes fired teargas at opposition protesters and killed a 17-year-old boy, who was hit in the head by a teargas canister. Human Rights Watch also received information that security forces injured nine other men during the protests. Gendarmes assaulted a French journalist after he filmed them beating an unarmed man, and later expelled him from the country. People who participated in the protests said that some violent protesters injured police officers with rocks.

On March 4, at about 1 p.m., around 10 policemen and gendarmes broke into the home of a 51-year-old Muslim cleric in Conakrys Wanindara neighborhood, beat him and other members of his family, and then arbitrarily arrested three family members and a neighbor. Witnesses and residents said the security forces were looking for the person who filmed a video showing police using a woman as a human shield in Conakry on January 29. The imam said:

Policemen and gendarmes broke into my compound, fired one gunshot, and destroyed the gate to enter. They searched all nine homes in the compound, turned them upside down. A gendarme beat me on the head with a ladle he took from my wives. He told me: “I am going to break your head.” Gendarmes also beat two of my neighbors, including an 80-year-old woman who had difficulties in hearing and seeing. Then they arrested my sons, my brother, and a neighbor. They had no warrant.

The four arrested men were taken to two gendarmerie stations, in Matoto and Cosa neighborhoods. The imams sons and brother were released the same day following a payment of 1 million Guinean francs [around US $104]. The neighbor was released the next day following a payment of 250,000 Guinean francs [around $26].

On February 19, gendarmes and policemen violently clamped down on an FNDC-led demonstration in Wanindara neighborhood, firing teargas and live rounds. They shot and wounded at least one protester, a 26-year-old driver, as he attempted to run away. The victim said: “Some of the gendarmes got down from their vehicles and chased protesters on foot. I ran and tried to hide, but a gendarme shot me in the thigh. I was taken to the hospital and spent 10 days in bed. The bullet is still in my leg.” The victim said he can now barely walk and is unable to work. Human Rights Watch also interviewed a friend of the victim who witnessed the incident, as well as the doctor who treated him.

Enforced Disappearances

Human Rights Watch spoke to 10 men who were forcibly disappeared for over 40 days following their arbitrary arrest by security forces in Conakry on February 11 and 12. They said that they were held without any contact with the outside world along with 30 other people, including at least two children and three men with intellectual disabilities, in a military base in Soronkoni, 700 kilometers from Conakry. Human Rights Watch also spoke to their lawyers and several family members and friends who corroborated their accounts. During their detention, the authorities refused to acknowledge their whereabouts.

Under international law, an enforced disappearance is any form of deprivation of liberty by agents of the state or by people or groups of people acting with the authorization, support, or acquiescence of the state, followed by a refusal to acknowledge the deprivation of liberty or by concealment of the fate or whereabouts of the disappeared person. Guinea has not signed the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance.

Former detainees and lawyers said that, with the exception of 4 people who were transferred to Conakrys central prison, the 36 others were released on March 28, without charge and without receiving any document proving their arrest and detention.

The men interviewed said they were never provided with any explanation for their arrest and detention, but that both the security forces who arrested them and the military who held them in Soronkoni accused them of supporting the opposition. A 20-year-old former detainee said that, upon arrest, a policeman told him: “You are those ones who barricade roads, who sow trouble, and who oppose those in power.” A 36-year-old former detainee said: “They told me I was a criminal, and that I make my country suffer. I replied [to] them that I am just a taximan. They told me to stay quiet and shut up.”

Under Guinean and international law, upon arrest people must be taken directly to recognized places of detention, such as police or gendarmerie stations and must have immediate access to their lawyer and family. All persons detained should be brought promptly before a judge to consider the legality and necessity of their detention. However, the people interviewed said they were held in a military base, and without any contact with the outside world. “Detaining someone in a military camp is contrary to our legislation,” a Guinean lawyer defending the detainees told Human Rights Watch. “Authorities should stop thinking Guinea is on another planet. We have laws prohibiting the practice of holding suspects outside of officially recognized detention sites.” A 26-year-old former detainee said: “My family had no idea where I was. They thought I was dead.”

Former detainees described squalid conditions in detention. “We were 40 in a cell with only one door, which was closed most of the time, and two small holes in the wall,” a 23-year-old detainee said. “There was not enough air; it was very hot. Many felt sick because of the heat, some collapsed.” Another detainee said that they were not given enough water, slept on the floor with no mattresses, and often were not allowed to go to the toilet outside and had to urinate in bottles.

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Dozens dead in Pakistan as PIA plane plunges into Karachi houses

Islamabad, Pakistan – At least 85 people have been killed after an Airbus A320 passenger airliner cr..

Islamabad, Pakistan – At least 85 people have been killed after an Airbus A320 passenger airliner crashed into a residential neighbourhood while on approach to the airport in the southern Pakistani city of Karachi, officials say.

At least two male passengers of Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) flight PK-8303 from the eastern city of Lahore to Karachi survived the crash on Friday, a health ministry spokeswoman told Al Jazeera.

There were at least 91 passengers on board the plane, according to an official passenger manifest shared with Al Jazeera by the officials.

Health ministry spokeswoman Meeran Yousuf told Al Jazeera by telephone that 85 people have died, with 53 bodies kept at Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi’s largest government hospital, and 32 at Civil Hospital Karachi, another major state-run hospital.

Yousuf said the two survivors were being treated at the hospitals in Karachi, while 19 bodies have been identified so far.

At least six people who were on the ground when the airliner crashed into houses in the densely populated Model Colony area of Karachi, adjacent to the city’s international airport, were being treated for their injuries, she added.

“Our plane [an Airbus] A320 which was coming from Lahore to Karachi was on final approach,” said PIA chief Arshad Malik in a video message released after the crash.

“The last words we heard from our pilot were that there is a technical problem and he was told on final approach that he has both runways available to him to land on. But the pilot decided that he wanted to go around.”

The plane then rapidly lost altitude and crashed short of the runway into the Model Colony neighbourhood, witnesses told the local media.

Dense plumes of black smoke rose above houses in the narrow streets of the neighbourhood, with television footage showing several houses crushed from the impact of the aircraft.

Parts of the plane, including the emergency exit door, were seen strewn in the streets.

Pakistan: Passenger plane with 107 onboard crashes


Wreckage of the PIA passenger plane crash can be seen in a residential area in Karachi [Sabir Mazhar/Anadolu]


Pakistan’s military said it had deployed helicopters to assess the damage and help ferry the dead and wounded to the hospitals.

An emergency was declared in all of the city’s hospitals, already reeling from a widespread outbreak of the coronavirus, provincial health minister Azra Pechucho told reporters.

“We are doing DNA testing of the dead bodies so that they can be identified and they can be given to their families,” she said.

“We were already in an emergency situation due to COVID, we were already alert … and now we have put the surgical units on alert as well.”

‘Shocked and saddened’

Pakistan resumed limited domestic flight operations last week, after a lengthy suspension due to the coronavirus outbreak, which has claimed more than 1,067 lives in the South Asian nation, according to the government data.

The Airbus A320, operated by Pakistan’s national flag carrier, was due to land in Karachi at 2:45pm local time (09:45 GMT) after an hour and a half in the air after departing Lahore earlier in the day.

In 2016, Pakistan suffered its deadliest recent air crash, when all 47 people on board a PIA Embraeur ATR aircraft were killed when it crashed into a mountain en route from the northern town of Chitral to the capital Islamabad.

In 2010, the country saw its worst air disaster, with all 152 people on board an Air Blue passenger flight killed when the plane crashed into the hills just north of the capital Islamabad.

Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan ordered an immediate inquiry into Friday’s crash.

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UK to introduce quarantine for international arrivals from June 8

Britain will introduce a 14-day quarantine for travellers arriving from abroad from June 8, interior..

Britain will introduce a 14-day quarantine for travellers arriving from abroad from June 8, interior minister Priti Patel said, with the government warning that anyone breaking the rules would face a fine or prosecution.

All international arrivals, including returning Britons, will have to self-isolate and provide details of where they will be staying under the plans, which were criticised by airlines, business groups and politicians alike.

“Now we are past the peak of this virus, we must take steps to guard against imported cases triggering a resurgence of this deadly disease,” Patel said at a news conference.

“We are not shutting down completely. We are not closing our borders.”

Those who breached the quarantine in the United Kingdom could be fined 1,000 UK pounds ($1,218), and spot checks would be carried out by health and border officials.

The quarantine will not apply to those arriving from the Republic of Ireland, nor to freight drivers, medical professionals or seasonal agricultural workers. The measures will be reviewed every three weeks.

The UK has recorded the highest number of deaths in Europe from coronavirus, with more than 36,000 people who have tested positive having died so far.

But the quarantine move is controversial, especially with the aviation sector, where flights have been grounded and passenger numbers slumped during lockdown measures.

Ryanair boss Michael O’Leary this week branded a proposed quarantine plan “idiotic” and accused ministers of “making it up as they go along”.

Virgin Atlantic said quarantine would prevent services from resuming and claimed there “simply won’t be sufficient demand to resume passenger services before August at the earliest”.

Trade body Airlines UK has said it “would effectively kill” international travel to the UK.

Others have questioned why Britain did not introduce quarantine earlier, like countries such as South Korea, Spain and the United States.

Ireland also imposes measures

In addition to Britain, travellers arriving in Ireland from next week will also be legally required to inform the government where they will quarantine for 14 days to prevent the spread of coronavirus, Minister for Health Simon Harris said on Friday.

“These are extraordinary measures but they are necessary in a time of a public health crisis,” said Harris in a statement.

From Thursday until at least June 18, those arriving in the Republic of Ireland will be legally required to complete a form noting the address where they will “self-isolate” for two weeks.

Failure to complete the form will carry a penalty of up to 2,500 euros ($2,725) and/or up to six months’ imprisonment.

All nationalities will be required to provide information, including those coming from neighbouring Britain.

Ireland has suffered 1,592 deaths from coronavirus according to the latest department of health figures. Recorded daily deaths peaked at 77 on April 20 but on Friday, the figure had fallen to 11.

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Trump predicts coronavirus vaccine by years end, vows plague will pass

As some states loosen lockdown restrictions in a bid to set the nation’s battered economy on the roa..

As some states loosen lockdown restrictions in a bid to set the nation’s battered economy on the road to recovery, President Trump endorsed a state-by-state approach while predicting at a Fox News virtual town hall on Sunday that a coronavirus vaccine could be available by December.

“I think we’ll have a vaccine by the end of the year,” Trump told the moderators, Fox News’ Bret Baier and Martha MacCallum, saying he was “very confident” in the assessment. “We’ll have a vaccine much sooner rather than later.”

Asked by MacCallum if he was concerned about the potential risks of accelerating a vaccine and human trials, Trump responded: “No, because they’re volunteers. They know what they’re getting into … They want to help the process.”

That timeline was dramatically ahead of previous estimates from both public and private sector experts at the outset of the pandemic, which had said a vaccine could take up to 18 months, if not longer. But, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said this weekend it was “doable if things fall in the right place” to have a vaccine by January.

CORONAVIRUS TIMELINE SHOWS SHIFTING RHETORIC ON THE PANDEMIC

Trump also predicted that the U.S. would be self-reliant on antibiotics, without needing to rely on China, within two years. Republicans have said it’s “crazy” that America is reliant on China, a communist adversary, for critical supplies including antibiotics.

President Donald Trump speaks during a Fox News virtual town hall from the Lincoln Memorial, Sunday, May 3, 2020, in Washington, co-moderated by FOX News anchors Bret Baier and Martha MacCallum. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Donald Trump speaks during a Fox News virtual town hall from the Lincoln Memorial, Sunday, May 3, 2020, in Washington, co-moderated by FOX News anchors Bret Baier and Martha MacCallum. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)


However, Trump predicted that as many as 100,000 Americans could die from the coronavirus, in a significant increase from his estimate of 60,000 last month. “Were going to lose anywhere from 75, 80 to 100,000 people,” Trump said, calling it a “horrible” situation. Without his administration’s actions, Trump asserted, “the minimum we would have lost was a million two, a million four, a million five, thats the minimum.”

Trump generally backed the efforts of America’s governors to manage the crisis, saying that each state will have a different approach to reopening their economies.

“It’s going to pass,” he assured, repeatedly referring to the outbreak as the “plague.”

Trump went on to assert that Democrats and media organizations, who have mocked him for touting the possible benefits of hydroxychloroquine in fighting coronavirus, were motivated by politics and “don’t want to see a good result.” Some media organizations even reported that an Arizona couple had consumed fish tank cleaner because they believed it contained hydroxychloroquine. The woman in that case had claimed she was following Trump’s advice despite openly attacking Trump on social media. Her husbands death after ingesting the liquid is now under investigation.

President Donald Trump speaks during a Fox News virtual town hall from the Lincoln Memorial, Sunday, May 3, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Donald Trump speaks during a Fox News virtual town hall from the Lincoln Memorial, Sunday, May 3, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)


Trump has consistently acknowledged during White House coronavirus briefings, beginning on March 19, that hydroxychloroquine might not work but was worth trying in some patients, given preliminary studies showing possible promising results. New, non-rigorous data has called those indicators into question, however.

“I’m standing up there and instead of a normal question, the level of anger and hatred. I’ll look at them, I’ll say ‘what is your problem?” Trump said at the town hall, referring to how the media treated him during White House coronavirus briefings.

Joe Biden, media outlets and other Democrats, Trump pointed out, had initially characterized his January travel ban on China as xenophobic, before changing their tune. When Baier queried Trump about a recent Biden tweet saying Trump had left the U.S. “unprepared” for a pandemic, Trump was immediately dismissive.

“Joe Biden didn’t write that,” Trump said. “That was written by a young man who got very good grades at a very good school.” At a previous Fox News town hall in March, Trump similarly implied that Biden is no longer mentally competent.

China, Trump said, had conclusively misled the world on the spread of the coronavirus. “I think, personally, they made a horrible mistake, and they didn’t want to admit it,” Trump said. He added that China had misled the World Health Organization, for which Trump suspended funding earlier in the year for failing to warn the global community and simply parroting China’s claims about the virus.

“The World Health Organization has been a disaster,” Trump said. “Everything they’ve said was wrong. And they’re China-centric. They agree with China, whatever China wants to do. So our country, perhaps foolishly in retrospect, has been paying $450 million a year to the World Health Organization. And China’s been paying $38 million a year. … So I’ll have to make a decision on that. … They missed every single call.”

Politico reported Sunday, citing the Department of Homeland Security, that China delayed informing the WHO that the coronavirus was contagious until it could first stockpile masks and other critical equipment.

A research dossier compiled by the so-called “Five Eyes” intelligence alliance, that reportedly concludes China intentionally hid or destroyed evidence of the coronavirus pandemic, is consistent with U.S. findings about the origins of the outbreak so far, senior U.S. officials told Fox News on Saturday. Fox News was the first to report that sources were increasingly confident the virus likely had escaped from a laboratory in Wuhan, China, where the naturally occurring strain was being studied. The matter remains under investigation, however.

Sunday’s town hall event was entitled “America Together: Returning to Work.” It featured video questions submitted by viewers on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

After what he called a “working weekend” at Camp David, Trump returned to the White House Sunday afternoon. The president has faced a cascading series of challenges in recent days, including protesters in Michigan storming the state capitol to protest stay-at-home orders, reports that North Korea’s leader was alive and healthy despite a CNN report that he was near death, and apparent discord within his administration as to the potential threat still posed by the coronavirus.

“A lot of people want to go back,” Trump told Baier and MacCallum. “You see demonstrations all over the country — and those are meaningful demonstrations. … Now we have to get it open. We have to get it open safely, but we have to get it open as quickly as possible.”

Asked by MacCallum whether he ever considers whether he went too far in pushing for a nationwide shutdown, Trump responded, “No, we did the right thing.” He added that millions of lives had been saved — but, he conceded, “I do look back on it.”

Trump said he has lost three friends due to the coronavirus: “This is a very advanced, very horrible thing we’re fighting. But, with all of that said, we’ve learned a lot about it. It affects older people. … This thing is vicious. And it can take you out. But children do very well. Young children do better than teens.”

At the same time, Trump said some states, including Virginia, aren’t opening up fast enough. He also took an apparent shot at California, where Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, ordered Orange County beaches — prompting hundreds of protesters to flood the city of Huntington Beach in protest.

The town hall came amid other whirlwind developments in Washington. Bombshell new disclosures by the Justice Department, for example, largely supported Trump’s claims that FBI officials furtively worked to target some of his former top officials.

Among other revelations, FBI communications made clear that top bureau officials discussed their motivations for interviewing former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn in the White House on January 24, 2017 — and openly questioned if their “goal” was “to get him to lie, so we can prosecute him or get him fired.”

Back in the White House, Trump tweeted Sunday that the intelligence community had vindicated him on another matter.

President Donald Trump speaks during a Fox News virtual town hall from the Lincoln Memorial, Sunday, May 3, 2020, in Washington, co-moderated by FOX News anchors Bret Baier and Martha MacCallum. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Donald Trump speaks during a Fox News virtual town hall from the Lincoln Memorial, Sunday, May 3, 2020, in Washington, co-moderated by FOX News anchors Bret Baier and Martha MacCallum. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)


“Intelligence has just reported to me that I was correct, and that they did NOT bring up the CoronaVirus subject matter until late into January, just prior to my banning China from the U.S.,” Trump wrote, apparently contradicting an earlier report in The Washington Post. “Also, they only spoke of the Virus in a very non-threatening, or matter of fact, manner……Fake News got it wrong again, as always, and tens of thousands of lives were saved by my EARLY BAN of China into our Country. The people that were allowed were heavily scrutinized and tested U.S. citizens, and as such, I welcome them with open arms!”

Responding to a viewer question on the Post’s report on Sunday, Trump pointed out that top Democrats were opposing his measures to close down travel from China. Trump said that on Jan. 23, he had indeed received an intelligence report on the virus, but it indicated it wouldn’t be a major threat. Trump said intelligence materials would be released on Monday to substantiate his claim.

Politico had reported that the Trump administration held a briefing on the coronavirus for senators on Jan. 24, but it was “sparsely attended” in part because it “was held on the same day as a deadline for senators to submit their impeachment questions.”

Trump was joined later by Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and Vice President Mike Pence, and the three emphasized that a payroll tax cut would be a necessary part of any future stimulus.

Mnuchin made clear that the White House was looking to “help states,” but not “bail out” any financial mismanagement.

Marine One, with President Donald Trump aboard, approaches the South Lawn of the White House, Sunday, May 3, 2020, in Washington. Trump is returning from a trip to Camp David, Md. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Marine One, with President Donald Trump aboard, approaches the South Lawn of the White House, Sunday, May 3, 2020, in Washington. Trump is returning from a trip to Camp David, Md. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)


Pence, meanwhile, admitted he had made a mistake during a recent hospital visit. “I should have worn the mask at the Mayo Clinic,” he said.

Trump’s appearance at the Lincoln Memorial was his first interview with Baier and MacCallum since the Fox News town hall in Scranton, Pa., on March 5.

But, the nation’s political and economic landscape has transformed dramatically in the several weeks since Trump’s last town hall, which featured an in-person audience in the early days of the coronavirus pandemic. Even then, Trump made sure to tout his decision to close most travel from China in January, even though Democrats and some media organizations initially characterized the move as xenophobic.

CHRISTINE BLASY FORD V. TARA READE ON THE EVIDENCE

HOW THE MEDIA, DEMS HAVE CHANGED TUNE SINCE KAVANAUGH

“One of the things I did is, I closed down the borders to China and to other areas that are very badly affected and really having a lot of troubles — I mean, countries and areas of countries that have had a lot of problems,” Trump told an audience member at the March town hall. “And, I closed them down very early, against the advice of almost everybody, and weve been given rave reviews.”

Also at the March town hall, Trump touted his Gallup poll numbers, which showed relatively high marks for the administration’s coronavirus response. Those numbers rose six points in the last two weeks, according to the latest Gallup poll.

President Donald Trump speaks during a Fox News virtual town hall from the Lincoln Memorial, Sunday, May 3, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Donald Trump speaks during a Fox News virtual town hall from the Lincoln Memorial, Sunday, May 3, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)


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The new survey found 49 percent approved of the presidents job in office and 47 percent disapproved, a personal best with Gallup for Trump.

Two weeks ago, 43 percent approved of the presidents job, according to the pollster. Trump also had a 49 percent approval rating in mid-March, according to Gallup, before his rating took a 6-point plunge in the first half of April.

However, Fox News polls showed that Biden has remained a strong rival for Trump in the early days of the campaign, and has surged ahead in key states.

For now, though, Trump made clear he was focused on confronting the pandemic more than political considerations. Asked at the end of the town hall what he had told family members about the crisis, Trump sounded an optimistic note.

“I sat down with my son, I sat down with my grandchildren. I said a terrible thing has happened,” the president told Baier. “But we’re going to be strong, we’re going to get out of it, and our country’s going to be bigger, better, and stronger than ever before.”

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