Connect with us

Health

Cataract Surgery on Ebola Survivors Safe for Docs

WEDNESDAY, April 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Doctors needn't worry when they perform cataract s..

WEDNESDAY, April 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Doctors needn't worry when they perform cataract surgery on Ebola survivors with eye problems caused by the highly contagious virus, a new study finds.

Between 13 percent and 34 percent of Ebola survivors develop eye inflammation (uveitis) that causes problems ranging from mild disease to blindness.

It was thought that Ebola could linger in eye fluid even after it had been cleared from the rest of the body, posing a risk to health care workers who come in close contact with survivors.

But in this study, researchers tested 50 Ebola survivors in Sierra Leone and found no evidence of the Ebola virus in their eye fluid. Thirty-four of the survivors later had cataract surgery that led to improved vision.

"These findings are truly exciting, as they improve our ability to impact vision care and quality of life for thousands of Ebola survivors at risk for eye disease," study author Dr. Steven Yeh said in an Emory University news release. He is an associate professor of ophthalmology, uveitis and vitreoretinal surgery at Emory's Eye Center in Atlanta.

The researchers noted that they could not determine if any of the survivors still had Ebola virus in their eye fluid at earlier points in time when they still had eye inflammation.

Thousands of survivors of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa between 2013 and 2016 are at risk for vision complications, so it is urgent to meet the needs of their ongoing medical and surgical eye care, the study authors said.

The study was published recently in the journal EBioMedicine.

More information

The World Health Organization has more on Ebola.

Original Article

[contf] [contfnew]

Health

[contfnewc] [contfnewc]

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Health

I lost my arms and legs – stop it happening to others

A man who woke from a coma to discover both his arms and legs had been amputated and part of his fac..

A man who woke from a coma to discover both his arms and legs had been amputated and part of his face removed has called for mandatory training on sepsis for NHS staff.

Sepsis, or blood poisoning, is a serious complication of an infection, which can have devastating consequences if not treated quickly.

There were delays in spotting Tom Ray's sepsis.

He says a commitment is needed to avoid more tragedies.

Tom's story

Tom Ray was fit and healthy and living in Rutland in the East Midlands before he contracted sepsis at the age of 38 in 1999.

He had had a successful career in corporate banking and was in the process of setting up a business with his pregnant wife, Nic, when he fell ill.

His sepsis – thought to be caused by a cut to his gum during a trip to the dentist, combined with a chest infection – came on rapidly and led to vomiting and a high temperature.

But it took five hours at the hospital he was admitted to before the condition was diagnosed.

He spent months in a coma, during which time his wife Nic gave birth to their second child, Freddy.

His recovery has been a long and gruelling process, involving years of plastic surgery. (more…)

Continue Reading

Health

I lost my arms and legs – stop it happening to others

A man who woke from a coma to discover both his arms and legs had been amputated and part of his fac..

A man who woke from a coma to discover both his arms and legs had been amputated and part of his face removed has called for mandatory training on sepsis for NHS staff.

Sepsis, or blood poisoning, is a serious complication of an infection, which can have devastating consequences if not treated quickly.

There were delays in spotting Tom Ray's sepsis.

He says a commitment is needed to avoid more tragedies.

Tom's story

Tom Ray was fit and healthy and living in Rutland in the East Midlands before he contracted sepsis at the age of 38 in 1999.

He had had a successful career in corporate banking and was in the process of setting up a business with his pregnant wife, Nic, when he fell ill.

His sepsis – thought to be caused by a cut to his gum during a trip to the dentist, combined with a chest infection – came on rapidly and led to vomiting and a high temperature.

But it took five hours at the hospital he was admitted to before the condition was diagnosed.

He spent months in a coma, during which time his wife Nic gave birth to their second child, Freddy.

His recovery has been a long and gruelling process, involving years of plastic surgery. (more…)

Continue Reading

Health

NHS ‘should not prescribe acne drug’

The parents of young people who have killed themselves and patients unable to have sex are calling f..

The parents of young people who have killed themselves and patients unable to have sex are calling for the NHS to stop prescribing acne drug Roaccutane.

Ed Henthorn said it had caused him erectile dysfunction, psychosis and suicidal thoughts.

And one man who believes his son killed himself after taking the drug said the risks "are just too high".

Manufacturer Roche said "millions of patients worldwide have benefited from taking the drug".

The majority of those who take the drug have a positive experience.

'Pretty overwhelming'

"I used to think about girls… but my feelings, thoughts, just faded away," Ed Henthorn told the BBC's Victoria Derbyshire programme.

He was 19 when he took Roaccutane. He describes his acne as mild but bad enough to want to treat.

After three weeks he started to experience side-effects, including reduced energy and sex drive.

Then he experienced erectile dysfunction.

"That was why I decided to stop taking it," he said. (more…)

Continue Reading

Trending