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Detective awarded for work catching child sex offenders

Detective and childrens champion, 55-year-old Jon Rouse of Ashgrove, has been named as Queenslands Australian of the Year.

Detective Inspector Rouse has 34 years service with Queensland Police.

In 1996 he began investigating crimes against children and in 2001 started Task Force Argos, where he implemented Australias first operation to proactively target internet child sex offenders.

The 2019 Queensland Australian of the Year Award winners were announced on Friday at a ceremony held at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre.

Other category winners were:

2019 Queensland Senior Australian of the Year – James Dale
2019 Queensland Young Australian of the Year – Angel Dixon
2019 Queensland Local Hero – Elijah Buol

The Queensland winners will join other state and territory award recipients from around the country as finalists in the national Australian of the Year awards, announced on January 25 in Canberra.

Detective Inspector Rouse has dedicated significant time to global a..

Detective and childrens champion, 55-year-old Jon Rouse of Ashgrove, has been named as Queenslands Australian of the Year.

Detective Inspector Rouse has 34 years service with Queensland Police.

In 1996 he began investigating crimes against children and in 2001 started Task Force Argos, where he implemented Australias first operation to proactively target internet child sex offenders.

The 2019 Queensland Australian of the Year Award winners were announced on Friday at a ceremony held at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre.

Other category winners were:

  • 2019 Queensland Senior Australian of the Year – James Dale
  • 2019 Queensland Young Australian of the Year – Angel Dixon
  • 2019 Queensland Local Hero – Elijah Buol

The Queensland winners will join other state and territory award recipients from around the country as finalists in the national Australian of the Year awards, announced on January 25 in Canberra.

Detective Inspector Rouse has dedicated significant time to global awareness of online child exploitation, delivering training and presentations to law enforcement officers across Australian and internationally.

He is sub-group chair of the Interpol Covert Internet Investigators Group and a director with the Society for the Policing of Cyberspace. In May, he received the Champion for Children Award in New York from the International Centre for Missing and Exploited Children.

Professor James Dale

The 2019 Queensland Senior Australian of the Year is 68-year-old scientist, Professor James Dale of Moggill.

A scientist, researcher and humanitarian, Professor Dale has led significant research programs in agricultural biotechnology.

He was the inaugural Director of the Centre for Tropical Crops and Bio-commodities at Queensland University of Technology and founded Australias first molecular farming company, Farmacule Bioindustries.

His ground-breaking work includes seeking a solution to Vitamin A deficiency, which leads to death of an estimated 670,000 children in developing countries, and blindness in another 400,000.

Professor Dale led a project to genetically modify bananas – the staple diet in many poor countries – to boost their pro-vitamin A levels. The release of these lifesaving bananas is planned for East Africa in four years.

He has also led developments including medical technology that enables rapid testing for genetic diseases, and molecular farming technology that aims to produce edible, plant-based vaccines.

Angel Dixon

Angel Dixon

The 2019 Queensland Young Australian of the Year is model and activist, 28-year-old Angel Dixon of the Gold Coast.

The first agency-signed model with a physical impairment to feature in a national television campaign, Angel Dixons mission is to challenge societies perception of disability.

The two-time Mercedes Benz Fashion Week model is a passionate activist for disability inclusion and human rights.

Aware of the power that the media has in forming perceptions, Angel is advocacy manager for not-for-profit organisation, Starting With Julius, and CEO of the Attitude Foundation.

Both organisations seek to accelerate the inclusion of people with disability through the creation of authentic media and education on inclusive principles.

Angel is also a member of the steering committee for NOW Australia, a not-for-profit that provides support for people who have experienced workplace sexual harassment.

A remarkable public speaker and blogger, Angels other passion is design. Shes currently working on a line of walking canes that will be marketed as a fashion accessory – making buying a mobility tool a more positive experience and helping change attitudes towards disability.

Elijah Buol

Elijah Buol

The 2019 Queensland Local Hero is advocate for young and disadvantaged people, 33-year-old Elijah Buol of Regents Park.

Since arriving as an unaccompanied minor from South Sudan, Elijah Buol – a criminologist, father of four and director of the Ethnic Communities Council of Queensland – spends much of his time helping young and disadvantaged community members integrate successfully into Australian society.

With qualifications including a Master of Law, Master of Justice in Intelligence and a Bachelor of Human Services this former refugee has held senior and volunteer positions in community and not-for-profit sectors.

Elijahs advocacy work was instrumental in helping remove children from adult prisons in Queensland.

Through motivational speaking and leadership training, Elijah has inspired many disadvantaged Indigenous, refugee and migrant young people.

He established the African Australian Womens Network, now the African Australian Womens Association, to improve the wellbeing of African women living in Australia. He has mentored through the prestigious Young African Australian Star Awards, celebrating high performing young African Australian Queenslanders, as president of Queensland African Communities Council.

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said this years state recipients were remarkable Queenslanders who had positively influenced our communities, our state and our nation.

“This prestigious annual awards program celebrates the achievements and contributions of Australias finest,” Ms Palaszczuk said.

“It is with great pleasure that I acknowledge these remarkable individuals as Queensland recipients who have impacted the lives of many.

“I would like to personally congratulate the 2019 recipients and wish you all the best of luck at the national announcement in Canberra.”

National Australia Day Council CEO Karlie Brand said the Queensland award recipients work was making a real difference for people in the community.

“We look forward to welcoming these great Queenslanders to Canberra in January for the national awards,” she said.

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Bogan Shire pauses to reflect this Anzac Day

The unity, sacrifice and human decency of soldiers and the meaning of Anzac day was discussed during the address given by Nyngan High School Captain Abbey Buchanan, while talking about the respect that lives on in the community. Ms Buchanan addressed hundreds of residents who gathered at the Cenotaph to remember not only the Anzac's, but all the brave Australian and New Zealanders who had fought for our country. “I think it's incredible as a community we stand together and celebrate Anzac Day and during this celebration the perspective of many community members young and old are heard and considered,” she said. “It is because of the participation of everyone here, especially the school students who marched, that the efforts of those who served for our country will never go unnoticed.” During her address Ms Buchanan described the Gallipoli campaign which cost over 130,000 lives and wounded 260,000 people from Great Britain, Ireland, Australia, France, New Zealand and the Ottom..

The unity, sacrifice and human decency of soldiers and the meaning of Anzac day was discussed during the address given by Nyngan High School Captain Abbey Buchanan, while talking about the respect that lives on in the community. Ms Buchanan addressed hundreds of residents who gathered at the Cenotaph to remember not only the Anzac's, but all the brave Australian and New Zealanders who had fought for our country. "I think it's incredible as a community we stand together and celebrate Anzac Day and during this celebration the perspective of many community members young and old are heard and considered," she said. "It is because of the participation of everyone here, especially the school students who marched, that the efforts of those who served for our country will never go unnoticed." During her address Ms Buchanan described the Gallipoli campaign which cost over 130,000 lives and wounded 260,000 people from Great Britain, Ireland, Australia, France, New Zealand and the Ottoman Empire. She however questioned the crowd as to why we stop to celebrate Anzac day, a day centered around the deaths of the soldiers who fought at Gallipoli 104 years ago. "When I think of Anzac my attention immediately turns to the noble qualities of mateship, courage and sacrifice. Three words which are spoken from thousands of mouths each Anzac day, that is still set in the core of what it means to be Australian," Ms Buchanan said. She discussed the accounts of Turkish soldiers who fought, one discussing the armistice and how race and ethnicity were not a barrier in achieving understanding and tolerance between soldiers during the ceasefire where they traded cigarettes and souvenirs. "Soldiers 100 years ago exhibited qualities we should be striving for today," the school captain said. "The term Anzac is and never was about the glorification of war, rather it exemplifies why peace and unity is associated with diversity, because today the whole country stands together and pay their respect to those who have fought in war." Story continues after video: For Ms Buchanan it's the reflection and perspective of the despair and sacrifice during the First World War, which makes the celebration of Anzac day extremely pivotal and relevant. "I can't imagine the battles the Australian Defence Force have endured, and I can't imagine the devastation that's left behind after these battles," she said. "I can't imagine the physical and mental fight of return soldiers. "I can't imagine my own mother, brother, father or sister going off to fight in war, because I cant imagine the heartbreak and sacrifice the thousands of people took for me, for our country and still continue to make today. "It makes the celebration of Anzac day extremely pivotal and relevant. "But this relevancy will never match the despair faced by soldiers and their families on the 25th April in 1915 and that is why we celebrate Anzac Day."

Bogan Shire pauses to reflect this Anzac Day

The unity, sacrifice and human decency of soldiers and the meaning of Anzac day was discussed during the address given by Nyngan High School Captain Abbey Buchanan, while talking about the respect that lives on in the community.

Ms Buchanan addressed hundreds of residents who gathered at the Cenotaph to remember not only the Anzac's, but all the brave Australian and New Zealanders who had fought for our country.

"I think it's incredible as a community we stand together and celebrate Anzac Day and during this celebration the perspective of many community members young and old are heard and considered," she said.

"It is because of the participation of everyone here, especially the school students who marched, that the efforts of those who served for our country will never go unnoticed."

During her address Ms Buchanan described the Gallipoli campaign which cost over 130,000 lives and wounded 260,000 people from Great Britain, Ireland, Australia, France, New Zealand and the Ottoman Empire.

She however questioned the crowd as to why we stop to celebrate Anzac day, a day centered around the deaths of the soldiers who fought at Gallipoli 104 years ago.

"When I think of Anzac my attention immediately turns to the noble qualities of mateship, courage and sacrifice. Three words which are spoken from thousands of Read More – Source

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Nyngan Observer

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A legend born from battle

Anzac Day salutes the courage and valour of those soldiers who fought at Gallipoli. They may have suffered defeat, however, their courage spawned a legend which is observed to this day. Those initial “Anzacs” were volunteers from the First Australian Imperial Force. They had just completed training in Egypt when they were called to serve alongside British and French troops sailing up the Dardanelles Strait. Their ultimate aim was to capture Gallipoli Peninsula, then under German and Ottoman control, through the sea route of the strait, a vital stretch of water connecting the Black Sea with the Aegean. Those original diggers must have been frightened and confused when they disembarked on the thin strip of beach known as Gaba Tepe on April 25, 1915. It was still dark and chilly as the boats disgorged about 20,000 Australian soldiers just before dawn on the Gallipoli peninsula. By nightfall, 747 of those soldiers would lie dead on the beach or close by in the surrounding steep cliffs. The..

Anzac Day salutes the courage and valour of those soldiers who fought at Gallipoli. They may have suffered defeat, however, their courage spawned a legend which is observed to this day. Those initial "Anzacs" were volunteers from the First Australian Imperial Force. They had just completed training in Egypt when they were called to serve alongside British and French troops sailing up the Dardanelles Strait. Their ultimate aim was to capture Gallipoli Peninsula, then under German and Ottoman control, through the sea route of the strait, a vital stretch of water connecting the Black Sea with the Aegean. Those original diggers must have been frightened and confused when they disembarked on the thin strip of beach known as Gaba Tepe on April 25, 1915. It was still dark and chilly as the boats disgorged about 20,000 Australian soldiers just before dawn on the Gallipoli peninsula. By nightfall, 747 of those soldiers would lie dead on the beach or close by in the surrounding steep cliffs. Their commanding officers had under-estimated the determination of the enemy Turks, under the command of Mustafa Kemal Atatrk. But the Australians and New Zealanders fought on. These "worthy sons of the Empire" fought a piecemeal battle under mixed orders. The Turks, perched atop the surrounding hills, took pot-shots at the troops. Despite the seeming impossibility of Winston Churchill's Dardanelles war plan, fighting on the peninsula dragged on for another eight-and-a-half months. In that time, 44,070 Allied troops were killed, 8709 of whom were Australians. The first Anzac Day was held on April 25, 1916, when every state held ceremonies to honour the fallen. Anzac Day provides the nation to pause and reflect on that horrific death toll from 1915.

Anzac Day salutes the courage and valour of those soldiers who fought at Gallipoli.

They may have suffered defeat, however, their courage spawned a legend which is observed to this day.

Those initial "Anzacs" were volunteers from the First Australian Imperial Force.

They had just completed training in Egypt when they were called to serve alongside British and French troops sailing up the Dardanelles Strait.

Their ultimate aim was to capture Gallipoli Peninsula, then under German and Ottoman control, through the sea route of the strait, a vital stretch of water connecting the Black Sea with the Aegean.

Those original diggers must have been frightened and confused when they disembarked on the thin strip of beach known as Gaba Tepe on April 25, 1915.

It was still dark and chilly as the boats disgorged about 20,000 Australian soldiers just before dawn on the Gallipoli peninsula. By nightfall, 747 of those soldiers would lie dead on the beach or close by in the surrounding steep cliffs.

Their commanding officers had under-estimated the determination of the enemy Turks, under the command of Mustafa Kemal Atatrk. But the Australians and New Zealanders fought on.

These "worthy sons of the Empire" fought a piecemeal battle under mixed orders.

The Turks, perched atop the surrounding hills, took pot-shots at the trRead More – Source

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Nyngan Observer

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Superhero flick a fun ride

In Captain Marvel, Vers/Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) endures a series of nightmares relating to her past. Trained in combat and the art of self-control by intergalactic general Yon-Rogg (Jude Law), Danvers is one of the Kree civilisation's greatest warriors. Abducted by the Skrulls and their leader Talos (Ben Mendelsohn), she begins a path towards uncovering her true identity. Captain Marvel, the 21st instalment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, is a light-hearted, easy-going thrill-ride designed to please everyone. Viewers don't need to watch/re-watch any of the preceding entries to enjoy this one. It's also the first instalment to feature a female superhero in the lead role. Working with witty lines and emotionally resonant moments here and there, Larsen excels as the titular character. Danvers/Captain Marvel is an interesting protagonist, but certainly not a complex one. As Danvers pieces together her backstory, the movie peppers in a handful of cheesy flashbacks. The ..

In Captain Marvel, Vers/Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) endures a series of nightmares relating to her past. Trained in combat and the art of self-control by intergalactic general Yon-Rogg (Jude Law), Danvers is one of the Kree civilisation's greatest warriors. Abducted by the Skrulls and their leader Talos (Ben Mendelsohn), she begins a path towards uncovering her true identity. Captain Marvel, the 21st instalment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, is a light-hearted, easy-going thrill-ride designed to please everyone. Viewers don't need to watch/re-watch any of the preceding entries to enjoy this one. It's also the first instalment to feature a female superhero in the lead role. Working with witty lines and emotionally resonant moments here and there, Larsen excels as the titular character. Danvers/Captain Marvel is an interesting protagonist, but certainly not a complex one. As Danvers pieces together her backstory, the movie peppers in a handful of cheesy flashbacks. The audience remains one step ahead of her at all times. The movie's feminist message is handled with little to no subtlety. Writer-directors Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck (Mississippi Grind, Half Nelson) deliver a lead character devoid of weaknesses. Lacking in tension and emotional heft, Captain Marvel depicts her as emotionless, all-powerful, and stubborn. Featuring Larson, Law, and a top-notch supporting cast (Gemma Chan, Djimon Hounsou etc.), the first act is a delight. After Danvers meets SHIELD agent Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) midway through, the pace wavers between speedy and sluggish. Larsen and Jackson's rapport prevents many scenes from becoming dull. Marvel Studios has perfected de-aging technology. Here, Jackson looks exactly like he did 25 years ago. Jackson is a joy to watch, while relative newcomer Lashana Lynch provides some much-needed depth as Maria – Danvers' long-lost best friend. Given strong enough material to stretch his acting muscles, Mendelsohn is thrilling in every scene. Boden and Fleck handle each talky moment with aplomb, but become overwhelmed by the spectacle. Many of the action sequences are choppily edited, while the climax – set on and above the earth – is bland and numbing. Made whole by a few nice twists and turns, Captain Marvel provides some fun ahead of Avengers: Endgame and Spider-Man: Far From Home. PS. both post-credit scenes are rather pointless. Captain Marvel screens this Saturday April 27 at the Margaret River HEART Cinema. For tickets and info visit www.artsmargaretriver.com

In Captain Marvel, Vers/Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) endures a series of nightmares relating to her past.

Trained in combat and the art of self-control by intergalactic general Yon-Rogg (Jude Law), Danvers is one of the Kree civilisation's greatest warriors.

Abducted by the Skrulls and their leader Talos (Ben Mendelsohn), she begins a path towards uncovering her true identity.

Captain Marvel, the 21st instalment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, is a light-hearted, easy-going thrill-ride designed to please everyone.

Viewers don't need to watch/re-watch any of the preceding entries to enjoy this one.

It's also the first instalment to feature a female superhero in the lead role.

Working with witty lines and emotionally resonant moments here and there, Larsen excels as the titular character.

Danvers/Captain Marvel is an interesting protagonist, but certainly not a complex one.

As Danvers pieces together her backstory, the movie peppers in a handful of cheesy flashbacks.

The audience remains one step ahead of her at all times.

The movie's feminist message is handled with little to no subtlety.

Writer-directors Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck (Mississippi Grind, Half Nelson) deliver a lead character devoid of weakRead More – Source

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Margaret River Mail

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