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The starting gun has been fired and the race to win the seat of Parkes at the 2019 federal election is underway. Water security, raising wages for low-paid workers, improving the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), spending more on education, lowering taxes and providing better support to cancer patients are among the key issues candidates representing major political parties said voters care about. READ ALSO: Workers fear Dubbo Forestry site sale could lead to Centrelink “I have a proven track record of delivering for this electorate for the past 11 years,” current National Party Member for Parkes Mark Coulton said. “I think voters know that come May 18, they have a very important choice to make between me, or the alternative, which would have a devastating impact for rural and regional communities right across my electorate. “We simply can't afford to take such a risk.” Country Labor candidate Jack Ayoub said the Parkes electorate is not getting its fair share of govern..

The starting gun has been fired and the race to win the seat of Parkes at the 2019 federal election is underway. Water security, raising wages for low-paid workers, improving the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), spending more on education, lowering taxes and providing better support to cancer patients are among the key issues candidates representing major political parties said voters care about. READ ALSO: Workers fear Dubbo Forestry site sale could lead to Centrelink "I have a proven track record of delivering for this electorate for the past 11 years," current National Party Member for Parkes Mark Coulton said. "I think voters know that come May 18, they have a very important choice to make between me, or the alternative, which would have a devastating impact for rural and regional communities right across my electorate. "We simply can't afford to take such a risk." Country Labor candidate Jack Ayoub said the Parkes electorate is not getting its fair share of government support and needs revitalised leadership. "Mark is a very nice man but, it is quite clear that's not cutting it in Canberra," he said. "The fundamental question is this; do we judge our nation by the tax loop holes for the few payed for by the many or how we use our wealth, as a nation to support those most in need?" READ MORE: Teen's goal to be a family trailblazer and why Dubbo is crucial to her hopes Mr Coulton said projects like the Western Cancer Centre and Inland Rail are game-changers for the region that he is proud to have been instrumental in delivering during his time in parliament. "Local issues I am hearing about include water security… and I'm pleased to have helped to deliver a $15 million funding commitment for Wilcannia Weir," he said. "I'm also hearing about concerns regarding individual cases under the NDIS, and more often than not, I am able to deliver a favourable outcome for my constituents." Mr Ayoub said ensuring all Australians get a fair go is his priority. "Closing the loop holes in 457 visas because Australian jobs should be filled by Australians [is a priority]," Mr Ayoub said. "I am, if elected, prepared to ask the hard questions and have the difficult conversation required to ensure we establish a policy that sees our river systems enhanced and our communities supported." READ ALSO: Dubbo Hospital secures MRI machine licence from federal government Mr Ayoub also reaffirmed a Labor promise to restoring penalty rates for workers who have lost up to $3,200 because of a Fair Work Commission decision. "The 2019 Budget is testament to the Liberal National Government's commitment to making a better life for those in the Parkes electorate, through tax relief, backing small business and supporting essential services," Mr Coulton said.

The starting gun has been fired and the race to win the seat of Parkes at the 2019 federal election is underway.

Water security, raising wages for low-paid workers, improving the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), spending more on education, lowering taxes and providing better support to cancer patients are among the key issues candidates representing major political parties said voters care about.

"I have a proven track record of delivering for this electorate for the past 11 years," current National Party Member for Parkes Mark Coulton said.

"I think voters know that come May 18, they have a very important choice to make between me, or the alternative, which would have a devastating impact for rural and regional communities right across my electorate.

"We simply can't afford to take such a risk."

Country Labor candidate Jack Ayoub said the Parkes electorate is not getting its fair share of government support and needs revitalised leadership.

"Mark is a very nice man but, it is quite clear that's not cutting it in Canberra," he said.

"The fundamental question is this; do we judge our nation by the tax loop holes for the few payed for by the many or how we use our wealth, as a nation to support those most in need?"

Mr Coulton said projects like the Western Cancer Centre and Inland Rail are game-changers for the region that he is proud to haveRead More – Source

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Bogan Shire pauses to reflect this Anzac Day

The unity, sacrifice and human decency of soldiers and the meaning of Anzac day was discussed during the address given by Nyngan High School Captain Abbey Buchanan, while talking about the respect that lives on in the community. Ms Buchanan addressed hundreds of residents who gathered at the Cenotaph to remember not only the Anzac's, but all the brave Australian and New Zealanders who had fought for our country. “I think it's incredible as a community we stand together and celebrate Anzac Day and during this celebration the perspective of many community members young and old are heard and considered,” she said. “It is because of the participation of everyone here, especially the school students who marched, that the efforts of those who served for our country will never go unnoticed.” During her address Ms Buchanan described the Gallipoli campaign which cost over 130,000 lives and wounded 260,000 people from Great Britain, Ireland, Australia, France, New Zealand and the Ottom..

The unity, sacrifice and human decency of soldiers and the meaning of Anzac day was discussed during the address given by Nyngan High School Captain Abbey Buchanan, while talking about the respect that lives on in the community. Ms Buchanan addressed hundreds of residents who gathered at the Cenotaph to remember not only the Anzac's, but all the brave Australian and New Zealanders who had fought for our country. "I think it's incredible as a community we stand together and celebrate Anzac Day and during this celebration the perspective of many community members young and old are heard and considered," she said. "It is because of the participation of everyone here, especially the school students who marched, that the efforts of those who served for our country will never go unnoticed." During her address Ms Buchanan described the Gallipoli campaign which cost over 130,000 lives and wounded 260,000 people from Great Britain, Ireland, Australia, France, New Zealand and the Ottoman Empire. She however questioned the crowd as to why we stop to celebrate Anzac day, a day centered around the deaths of the soldiers who fought at Gallipoli 104 years ago. "When I think of Anzac my attention immediately turns to the noble qualities of mateship, courage and sacrifice. Three words which are spoken from thousands of mouths each Anzac day, that is still set in the core of what it means to be Australian," Ms Buchanan said. She discussed the accounts of Turkish soldiers who fought, one discussing the armistice and how race and ethnicity were not a barrier in achieving understanding and tolerance between soldiers during the ceasefire where they traded cigarettes and souvenirs. "Soldiers 100 years ago exhibited qualities we should be striving for today," the school captain said. "The term Anzac is and never was about the glorification of war, rather it exemplifies why peace and unity is associated with diversity, because today the whole country stands together and pay their respect to those who have fought in war." Story continues after video: For Ms Buchanan it's the reflection and perspective of the despair and sacrifice during the First World War, which makes the celebration of Anzac day extremely pivotal and relevant. "I can't imagine the battles the Australian Defence Force have endured, and I can't imagine the devastation that's left behind after these battles," she said. "I can't imagine the physical and mental fight of return soldiers. "I can't imagine my own mother, brother, father or sister going off to fight in war, because I cant imagine the heartbreak and sacrifice the thousands of people took for me, for our country and still continue to make today. "It makes the celebration of Anzac day extremely pivotal and relevant. "But this relevancy will never match the despair faced by soldiers and their families on the 25th April in 1915 and that is why we celebrate Anzac Day."

Bogan Shire pauses to reflect this Anzac Day

The unity, sacrifice and human decency of soldiers and the meaning of Anzac day was discussed during the address given by Nyngan High School Captain Abbey Buchanan, while talking about the respect that lives on in the community.

Ms Buchanan addressed hundreds of residents who gathered at the Cenotaph to remember not only the Anzac's, but all the brave Australian and New Zealanders who had fought for our country.

"I think it's incredible as a community we stand together and celebrate Anzac Day and during this celebration the perspective of many community members young and old are heard and considered," she said.

"It is because of the participation of everyone here, especially the school students who marched, that the efforts of those who served for our country will never go unnoticed."

During her address Ms Buchanan described the Gallipoli campaign which cost over 130,000 lives and wounded 260,000 people from Great Britain, Ireland, Australia, France, New Zealand and the Ottoman Empire.

She however questioned the crowd as to why we stop to celebrate Anzac day, a day centered around the deaths of the soldiers who fought at Gallipoli 104 years ago.

"When I think of Anzac my attention immediately turns to the noble qualities of mateship, courage and sacrifice. Three words which are spoken from thousands of Read More – Source

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A legend born from battle

Anzac Day salutes the courage and valour of those soldiers who fought at Gallipoli. They may have suffered defeat, however, their courage spawned a legend which is observed to this day. Those initial “Anzacs” were volunteers from the First Australian Imperial Force. They had just completed training in Egypt when they were called to serve alongside British and French troops sailing up the Dardanelles Strait. Their ultimate aim was to capture Gallipoli Peninsula, then under German and Ottoman control, through the sea route of the strait, a vital stretch of water connecting the Black Sea with the Aegean. Those original diggers must have been frightened and confused when they disembarked on the thin strip of beach known as Gaba Tepe on April 25, 1915. It was still dark and chilly as the boats disgorged about 20,000 Australian soldiers just before dawn on the Gallipoli peninsula. By nightfall, 747 of those soldiers would lie dead on the beach or close by in the surrounding steep cliffs. The..

Anzac Day salutes the courage and valour of those soldiers who fought at Gallipoli. They may have suffered defeat, however, their courage spawned a legend which is observed to this day. Those initial "Anzacs" were volunteers from the First Australian Imperial Force. They had just completed training in Egypt when they were called to serve alongside British and French troops sailing up the Dardanelles Strait. Their ultimate aim was to capture Gallipoli Peninsula, then under German and Ottoman control, through the sea route of the strait, a vital stretch of water connecting the Black Sea with the Aegean. Those original diggers must have been frightened and confused when they disembarked on the thin strip of beach known as Gaba Tepe on April 25, 1915. It was still dark and chilly as the boats disgorged about 20,000 Australian soldiers just before dawn on the Gallipoli peninsula. By nightfall, 747 of those soldiers would lie dead on the beach or close by in the surrounding steep cliffs. Their commanding officers had under-estimated the determination of the enemy Turks, under the command of Mustafa Kemal Atatrk. But the Australians and New Zealanders fought on. These "worthy sons of the Empire" fought a piecemeal battle under mixed orders. The Turks, perched atop the surrounding hills, took pot-shots at the troops. Despite the seeming impossibility of Winston Churchill's Dardanelles war plan, fighting on the peninsula dragged on for another eight-and-a-half months. In that time, 44,070 Allied troops were killed, 8709 of whom were Australians. The first Anzac Day was held on April 25, 1916, when every state held ceremonies to honour the fallen. Anzac Day provides the nation to pause and reflect on that horrific death toll from 1915.

Anzac Day salutes the courage and valour of those soldiers who fought at Gallipoli.

They may have suffered defeat, however, their courage spawned a legend which is observed to this day.

Those initial "Anzacs" were volunteers from the First Australian Imperial Force.

They had just completed training in Egypt when they were called to serve alongside British and French troops sailing up the Dardanelles Strait.

Their ultimate aim was to capture Gallipoli Peninsula, then under German and Ottoman control, through the sea route of the strait, a vital stretch of water connecting the Black Sea with the Aegean.

Those original diggers must have been frightened and confused when they disembarked on the thin strip of beach known as Gaba Tepe on April 25, 1915.

It was still dark and chilly as the boats disgorged about 20,000 Australian soldiers just before dawn on the Gallipoli peninsula. By nightfall, 747 of those soldiers would lie dead on the beach or close by in the surrounding steep cliffs.

Their commanding officers had under-estimated the determination of the enemy Turks, under the command of Mustafa Kemal Atatrk. But the Australians and New Zealanders fought on.

These "worthy sons of the Empire" fought a piecemeal battle under mixed orders.

The Turks, perched atop the surrounding hills, took pot-shots at the trRead More – Source

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Superhero flick a fun ride

In Captain Marvel, Vers/Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) endures a series of nightmares relating to her past. Trained in combat and the art of self-control by intergalactic general Yon-Rogg (Jude Law), Danvers is one of the Kree civilisation's greatest warriors. Abducted by the Skrulls and their leader Talos (Ben Mendelsohn), she begins a path towards uncovering her true identity. Captain Marvel, the 21st instalment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, is a light-hearted, easy-going thrill-ride designed to please everyone. Viewers don't need to watch/re-watch any of the preceding entries to enjoy this one. It's also the first instalment to feature a female superhero in the lead role. Working with witty lines and emotionally resonant moments here and there, Larsen excels as the titular character. Danvers/Captain Marvel is an interesting protagonist, but certainly not a complex one. As Danvers pieces together her backstory, the movie peppers in a handful of cheesy flashbacks. The ..

In Captain Marvel, Vers/Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) endures a series of nightmares relating to her past. Trained in combat and the art of self-control by intergalactic general Yon-Rogg (Jude Law), Danvers is one of the Kree civilisation's greatest warriors. Abducted by the Skrulls and their leader Talos (Ben Mendelsohn), she begins a path towards uncovering her true identity. Captain Marvel, the 21st instalment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, is a light-hearted, easy-going thrill-ride designed to please everyone. Viewers don't need to watch/re-watch any of the preceding entries to enjoy this one. It's also the first instalment to feature a female superhero in the lead role. Working with witty lines and emotionally resonant moments here and there, Larsen excels as the titular character. Danvers/Captain Marvel is an interesting protagonist, but certainly not a complex one. As Danvers pieces together her backstory, the movie peppers in a handful of cheesy flashbacks. The audience remains one step ahead of her at all times. The movie's feminist message is handled with little to no subtlety. Writer-directors Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck (Mississippi Grind, Half Nelson) deliver a lead character devoid of weaknesses. Lacking in tension and emotional heft, Captain Marvel depicts her as emotionless, all-powerful, and stubborn. Featuring Larson, Law, and a top-notch supporting cast (Gemma Chan, Djimon Hounsou etc.), the first act is a delight. After Danvers meets SHIELD agent Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) midway through, the pace wavers between speedy and sluggish. Larsen and Jackson's rapport prevents many scenes from becoming dull. Marvel Studios has perfected de-aging technology. Here, Jackson looks exactly like he did 25 years ago. Jackson is a joy to watch, while relative newcomer Lashana Lynch provides some much-needed depth as Maria – Danvers' long-lost best friend. Given strong enough material to stretch his acting muscles, Mendelsohn is thrilling in every scene. Boden and Fleck handle each talky moment with aplomb, but become overwhelmed by the spectacle. Many of the action sequences are choppily edited, while the climax – set on and above the earth – is bland and numbing. Made whole by a few nice twists and turns, Captain Marvel provides some fun ahead of Avengers: Endgame and Spider-Man: Far From Home. PS. both post-credit scenes are rather pointless. Captain Marvel screens this Saturday April 27 at the Margaret River HEART Cinema. For tickets and info visit www.artsmargaretriver.com

In Captain Marvel, Vers/Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) endures a series of nightmares relating to her past.

Trained in combat and the art of self-control by intergalactic general Yon-Rogg (Jude Law), Danvers is one of the Kree civilisation's greatest warriors.

Abducted by the Skrulls and their leader Talos (Ben Mendelsohn), she begins a path towards uncovering her true identity.

Captain Marvel, the 21st instalment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, is a light-hearted, easy-going thrill-ride designed to please everyone.

Viewers don't need to watch/re-watch any of the preceding entries to enjoy this one.

It's also the first instalment to feature a female superhero in the lead role.

Working with witty lines and emotionally resonant moments here and there, Larsen excels as the titular character.

Danvers/Captain Marvel is an interesting protagonist, but certainly not a complex one.

As Danvers pieces together her backstory, the movie peppers in a handful of cheesy flashbacks.

The audience remains one step ahead of her at all times.

The movie's feminist message is handled with little to no subtlety.

Writer-directors Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck (Mississippi Grind, Half Nelson) deliver a lead character devoid of weakRead More – Source

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