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Superhero flick a fun ride

In Captain Marvel, Vers/Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) endures a series of nightmares relating to her past. Trained in combat and the art of self-control by intergalactic general Yon-Rogg (Jude Law), Danvers is one of the Kree civilisation's greatest warriors. Abducted by the Skrulls and their leader Talos (Ben Mendelsohn), she begins a path towards uncovering her true identity. Captain Marvel, the 21st instalment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, is a light-hearted, easy-going thrill-ride designed to please everyone. Viewers don't need to watch/re-watch any of the preceding entries to enjoy this one. It's also the first instalment to feature a female superhero in the lead role. Working with witty lines and emotionally resonant moments here and there, Larsen excels as the titular character. Danvers/Captain Marvel is an interesting protagonist, but certainly not a complex one. As Danvers pieces together her backstory, the movie peppers in a handful of cheesy flashbacks. The ..

In Captain Marvel, Vers/Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) endures a series of nightmares relating to her past. Trained in combat and the art of self-control by intergalactic general Yon-Rogg (Jude Law), Danvers is one of the Kree civilisation's greatest warriors. Abducted by the Skrulls and their leader Talos (Ben Mendelsohn), she begins a path towards uncovering her true identity. Captain Marvel, the 21st instalment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, is a light-hearted, easy-going thrill-ride designed to please everyone. Viewers don't need to watch/re-watch any of the preceding entries to enjoy this one. It's also the first instalment to feature a female superhero in the lead role. Working with witty lines and emotionally resonant moments here and there, Larsen excels as the titular character. Danvers/Captain Marvel is an interesting protagonist, but certainly not a complex one. As Danvers pieces together her backstory, the movie peppers in a handful of cheesy flashbacks. The audience remains one step ahead of her at all times. The movie's feminist message is handled with little to no subtlety. Writer-directors Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck (Mississippi Grind, Half Nelson) deliver a lead character devoid of weaknesses. Lacking in tension and emotional heft, Captain Marvel depicts her as emotionless, all-powerful, and stubborn. Featuring Larson, Law, and a top-notch supporting cast (Gemma Chan, Djimon Hounsou etc.), the first act is a delight. After Danvers meets SHIELD agent Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) midway through, the pace wavers between speedy and sluggish. Larsen and Jackson's rapport prevents many scenes from becoming dull. Marvel Studios has perfected de-aging technology. Here, Jackson looks exactly like he did 25 years ago. Jackson is a joy to watch, while relative newcomer Lashana Lynch provides some much-needed depth as Maria – Danvers' long-lost best friend. Given strong enough material to stretch his acting muscles, Mendelsohn is thrilling in every scene. Boden and Fleck handle each talky moment with aplomb, but become overwhelmed by the spectacle. Many of the action sequences are choppily edited, while the climax – set on and above the earth – is bland and numbing. Made whole by a few nice twists and turns, Captain Marvel provides some fun ahead of Avengers: Endgame and Spider-Man: Far From Home. PS. both post-credit scenes are rather pointless. Captain Marvel screens this Saturday April 27 at the Margaret River HEART Cinema. For tickets and info visit www.artsmargaretriver.com

In Captain Marvel, Vers/Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) endures a series of nightmares relating to her past.

Trained in combat and the art of self-control by intergalactic general Yon-Rogg (Jude Law), Danvers is one of the Kree civilisation's greatest warriors.

Abducted by the Skrulls and their leader Talos (Ben Mendelsohn), she begins a path towards uncovering her true identity.

Captain Marvel, the 21st instalment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, is a light-hearted, easy-going thrill-ride designed to please everyone.

Viewers don't need to watch/re-watch any of the preceding entries to enjoy this one.

It's also the first instalment to feature a female superhero in the lead role.

Working with witty lines and emotionally resonant moments here and there, Larsen excels as the titular character.

Danvers/Captain Marvel is an interesting protagonist, but certainly not a complex one.

As Danvers pieces together her backstory, the movie peppers in a handful of cheesy flashbacks.

The audience remains one step ahead of her at all times.

The movie's feminist message is handled with little to no subtlety.

Writer-directors Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck (Mississippi Grind, Half Nelson) deliver a lead character devoid of weakRead More – Source

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Margaret River Mail

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Town’s best to take to the stage in annual concert

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Uni student’s survey aims to help boost lamb survival

Sheep producers across western NSW are being encouraged to participate in an online survey that investigates vaccination and nutritional supplementation of sheep. Former Peak Hill resident and current Charles Sturt University student, Kayla Kopp, is conducting the investigation as part of her studies. Ms Kopp's PhD at Charles Sturt's School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences is investigating the nutritional supplementation of lambing ewes and sheep producers are being asked to take part in the survey. The survey takes approximately 15 minutes and participants remain anonymous. READ ALSO: Charles Sturt students win top tertiary team at merino challenge The project is supervised Professor Michael Friend and is part of a wider body of research at the Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation, an alliance between Charles Sturt and the NSW Department of Primary Industries, that aims to improve the productivity and profitability of sheep production. “One in five lambs born in Austra..

Sheep producers across western NSW are being encouraged to participate in an online survey that investigates vaccination and nutritional supplementation of sheep. Former Peak Hill resident and current Charles Sturt University student, Kayla Kopp, is conducting the investigation as part of her studies. Ms Kopp's PhD at Charles Sturt's School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences is investigating the nutritional supplementation of lambing ewes and sheep producers are being asked to take part in the survey. The survey takes approximately 15 minutes and participants remain anonymous. READ ALSO: Charles Sturt students win top tertiary team at merino challenge The project is supervised Professor Michael Friend and is part of a wider body of research at the Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation, an alliance between Charles Sturt and the NSW Department of Primary Industries, that aims to improve the productivity and profitability of sheep production. "One in five lambs born in Australia die within days of birth, costing the industry over $1 billion each year," Professor Friend said. "Our research aims to better understand how those losses occur and to develop knowledge and tools that will help producers improve animal health and boost lamb survival." READ ALSO: Walgett's Jill Roughley, runs her property with guts and determination The survey is available online (www.surveymonkey.com/r/ lambsurvey) and sheep producers are invited to take part in the research until Saturday, August 31. Participants must be producers currently involved in the sheep industry either as farm owners or managers in NSW; must have ewes lambing on their property annually; and must have at least 50 sheep on their property. The survey builds on Miss Kopp's earlier field studies focused on nutritional supplementation and milk production. Data from the study will contribute to research on animal welfare, animal nutrition and sheep production.

Sheep producers across western NSW are being encouraged to participate in an online survey that investigates vaccination and nutritional supplementation of sheep.

Former Peak Hill resident and current Charles Sturt University student, Kayla Kopp, is conducting the investigation as part of her studies.

Ms Kopp's PhD at Charles Sturt's School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences is investigating the nutritional supplementation of lambing ewes and sheep producers are being asked to take part in the survey.

The survey takes approximately 15 minutes and participants remain anonymous.

The project is supervised Professor Michael Friend and is part of a wider body of research at the Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation, an alliance between Charles Sturt and the NSW Department of Primary Industries, that aims to improve the productivity and profitability of sheep production.

"One in five lambs born in Australia die within days of birth, costing the industry over $1 billion each year," Professor Friend said.

"Our reRead More – Source

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Nyngan Observer

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Margaret River’s women in wine head to New York

Three women from the Margaret River region's wine industry have been invited to New York City for the Australian Women in Wine Awards on Tuesday September 17. Finalists from the region include Vanya Cullen – who has once again been nominated for a Winemaker of the Year award – making it the second time she has received such an accolade this year. Also nominated in the Australian Women in Wines Awards were Howard Parks marketing officer Rebecca Love and Clairault Streicker cellar door person Ulrika Larsson. Ms Love has been nominated for Marketer of the Year and Ms Larsson has been nominated for Cellar Door Person of the Year. Australian Women in Wine Awards founder and chair Jane Thomson said the depth and breadth of talent entered in the awards this year made it exceptionally difficult for their judges. “It just goes to show that after five years of operation, we are continuing to attract the very best female talent in the Australian wine community,” she said. “Theirs are excepti..

Three women from the Margaret River region's wine industry have been invited to New York City for the Australian Women in Wine Awards on Tuesday September 17. Finalists from the region include Vanya Cullen – who has once again been nominated for a Winemaker of the Year award – making it the second time she has received such an accolade this year. Also nominated in the Australian Women in Wines Awards were Howard Parks marketing officer Rebecca Love and Clairault Streicker cellar door person Ulrika Larsson. Ms Love has been nominated for Marketer of the Year and Ms Larsson has been nominated for Cellar Door Person of the Year. Australian Women in Wine Awards founder and chair Jane Thomson said the depth and breadth of talent entered in the awards this year made it exceptionally difficult for their judges. "It just goes to show that after five years of operation, we are continuing to attract the very best female talent in the Australian wine community," she said. "Theirs are exceptional stories that deserve to be told and celebrated." More than 35 Australian female wine producers have been invited to the invitation only event, which will be live streamed back to Australia via the Australian Women in Wine's Facebook page. More information on the Australian Women in Wine Awards can be found at WomeninWineAwards.com.au.

Three women from the Margaret River region's wine industry have been invited to New York City for the Australian Women in Wine Awards on Tuesday September 17.

Finalists from the region include Vanya Cullen – who has once again been nominated for a Winemaker of the Year award – making it the second time she has received such an accolade this year.

Also nominated in the Australian Women in Wines Awards were Howard Parks marketing officer Rebecca Love and Clairault Streicker cellar door person Ulrika Larsson.

Ms Love has been nominated for Marketer of the Year and Ms Larsson has been nominated for CRead More – Source

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Margaret River Mail

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