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Pope issues new rules on reporting sexual abuse

The new rules require all Catholic dioceses around the world to have a “public and accessible” syste..

The new rules require all Catholic dioceses around the world to have a "public and accessible" system in place for reporting abuse by June 1, 2020.The new norms cover internal Catholic Church procedure, not the issue of reporting abuse or cover-up to civil authorities, and represent a top-down imposition which must be followed by all dioceses.Archbishop Charles Scicluna, Vatican's top investigator of sex abuse, told CNN that the new rules add a layer of accountability for church leaders."First of all that leadership is not above the law," Scicluna said, "and second that leadership needs to know, all of us in leadership we need to know, that if the people love the Church they're going to denounce us when we do something wrong."Most dioceses in the US and Europe already have these systems, and the new norms will likely be more important in countries where there are not already well-established guidelines for reporting and handling sexual abuse.Under the new rules, investigations into credible reports of sexual abuse must be completed within 90 days, and a no-retaliation clause protects the person reporting abuse from tit-for-tat claims or obligations for them to keep quiet.Top Vatican official Cardinal Marc Ouellet told the Vatican's in-house newspaper the mandatory reporting requirement was the most important element in the new rules.Ouellet told Osservatore Romano that it's significant that "besides the abuses on the minors and on the vulnerable adults that the harassment or violence of abuse of power also be reported."For decades the Catholic Church has been plagued by a series of sex abuse scandals in different countries around the world.The new norms follow a global meeting on sex abuse at the Vatican in February and represent Pope Francis' pledge to offer "concrete measures" to combat sexual abuse.There has not previously been a uniform, universal system in the Catholic Church for reporting and investigating allegations of abuse.The new rules were set out in an Apostolic letter, called a "Motu Proprio," issued personally by Pope Francis, which calls for a three-year trial period for the initiative.Although the norms represent an important clarification of procedures to be followed, they do not deal with the question of what happens to a priest or bishop who breaks these rules.To date, no church official has been publicly sanctioned for cover-up, and a lack of accountability is something that survivors have been concerned about for years. After Bishop Robert Finn, the formerly the head of a Kansas City diocese, was convicted of failing to report child abuse in 2012, advocates for abuse survivorsRead More – Source

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Pope issues new rules on reporting sexual abuse

The new rules require all Catholic dioceses around the world to have a “public and accessible” syste..

The new rules require all Catholic dioceses around the world to have a "public and accessible" system in place for reporting abuse by June 1, 2020.The new norms cover internal Catholic Church procedure, not the issue of reporting abuse or cover-up to civil authorities, and represent a top-down imposition which must be followed by all dioceses.Archbishop Charles Scicluna, Vatican's top investigator of sex abuse, told CNN that the new rules add a layer of accountability for church leaders."First of all that leadership is not above the law," Scicluna said, "and second that leadership needs to know, all of us in leadership we need to know, that if the people love the Church they're going to denounce us when we do something wrong."Most dioceses in the US and Europe already have these systems, and the new norms will likely be more important in countries where there are not already well-established guidelines for reporting and handling sexual abuse.Under the new rules, investigations into credible reports of sexual abuse must be completed within 90 days, and a no-retaliation clause protects the person reporting abuse from tit-for-tat claims or obligations for them to keep quiet.Top Vatican official Cardinal Marc Ouellet told the Vatican's in-house newspaper the mandatory reporting requirement was the most important element in the new rules.Ouellet told Osservatore Romano that it's significant that "besides the abuses on the minors and on the vulnerable adults that the harassment or violence of abuse of power also be reported."For decades the Catholic Church has been plagued by a series of sex abuse scandals in different countries around the world.The new norms follow a global meeting on sex abuse at the Vatican in February and represent Pope Francis' pledge to offer "concrete measures" to combat sexual abuse.There has not previously been a uniform, universal system in the Catholic Church for reporting and investigating allegations of abuse.The new rules were set out in an Apostolic letter, called a "Motu Proprio," issued personally by Pope Francis, which calls for a three-year trial period for the initiative.Although the norms represent an important clarification of procedures to be followed, they do not deal with the question of what happens to a priest or bishop who breaks these rules.To date, no church official has been publicly sanctioned for cover-up, and a lack of accountability is something that survivors have been concerned about for years. After Bishop Robert Finn, the formerly the head of a Kansas City diocese, was convicted of failing to report child abuse in 2012, advocates for abuse survivorsRead More – Source

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At least 41 people killed after Russian plane crash lands

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Socialist party wins in Spain despite far-right surge

The far-right Vox party — which takes a hardline on immigration and gender rights — won 24 out of a ..

The far-right Vox party — which takes a hardline on immigration and gender rights — won 24 out of a total 350 seats, after bursting onto Spain's political scene last year.In an election with 75.8% turnout, the governing PSOE took 123 seats, and will now seek the support of other parties to form a government, having fallen short of an overall majority.Spanish politics is fragmenting further, as PSOE's traditional rivals, the conservative People's Party (PP) won 66 seats, down from 137 in 2016's election.For years Spain was governed by the PP or PSOE, but Podemos, Ciudadanos and Vox have emerged in recent years, shaking up the two-party established order.A total of 176 seats is required to control parliament, and neither the leftist nor the right-leaning bloc won the required amount. Center-right Ciudadanos won 57 seats while left-wing Unidas Podemos won 35.With more than 98% of the vote counted the PSOE was declared winner by Spanish government spokeswoman Isabel Celaá Diéguez.Incumbent PSOE Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez addressed supporters outside the party headquarters in Madrid after the result was confirmed."After 11 years a socialist party has won the general election in Spain. And so the future beats the past," he said as the PSOE gained 38 seats more than in 2016."We have sent a message to Europe and to the world, that we can win over authoritarianism."A nun votes in Barcelona on Sunday during the third Spanish general election in four years.

Sanchez to negotiate a deal

Spain is the only country in western Europe that has never been governed by a coalition government, though recent years have seen minority governments shored up by parliamentary alliances.A new government could include the Basque Nationalist Party, known as PNV, or the Catalan separatists that forced the elections in the first place after refusing to support Sanchez's 2019 budget in February.Analyst Jose Torreblanca of the European Council on Foreign Relations told CNN the PSOE and Ciudadanos are the winners of the election, while the PP suffered a "complete defeat" as a "divided right wing committed suicide."Spanish elections show where the UK may be headedAlbert Rivera, leader of Ciudadanos, said "the bad news today is that Sanchez will govern with Podemos and the separatists … but there is a project with a future in Ciudadanos."Rivera promised his followers that the party will govern soon."Ciudadanos has risen as the hope and the future of Spain," he added, after the party won 25 more seats than in 2016.PP leader Pablo Casado congratulated Sanchez for his victory and said he hoped his rival "would be able to govern without the support of the Catalan separatists."Sanchez could agree a deal with Podemos or Ciudadanos, according to Torreblanca.Pablo Iglesias, leader of Unidas PodemosRead More – Source

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