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Police praise community following arrest of Bourke male

Police are praising the community for their assistance following the arrest of a 26-year-old Bourke male. Police were called on Thursday morning following reports of a number of thefts from vehicles were coins had been stolen and further calls of an intruder at local home and an accommodation complex. Police reported they spotted the suspect walking along the train line Thursday morning. After a brief pursuit on foot, police apprehended the suspect in the backyard of a Pangee Street residence. The man was charged with numerous trespass offences, stealing from a local business and having coins in his possession suspected of being stolen from cars. The man was refused bail and will appear before the Dubbo local court. READ ALSO: A stolen car was located just outside of town is being forensically examined and further charges may be laid. Nyngan Police Sergeant Tony Wood praised the community for working with the police to combat crime. “The stolen car was located by a local teenager ridin..

Police are praising the community for their assistance following the arrest of a 26-year-old Bourke male. Police were called on Thursday morning following reports of a number of thefts from vehicles were coins had been stolen and further calls of an intruder at local home and an accommodation complex. Police reported they spotted the suspect walking along the train line Thursday morning. After a brief pursuit on foot, police apprehended the suspect in the backyard of a Pangee Street residence. The man was charged with numerous trespass offences, stealing from a local business and having coins in his possession suspected of being stolen from cars. The man was refused bail and will appear before the Dubbo local court. READ ALSO: A stolen car was located just outside of town is being forensically examined and further charges may be laid. Nyngan Police Sergeant Tony Wood praised the community for working with the police to combat crime. "The stolen car was located by a local teenager riding a bike, and the suspect was apprehended with the assistance of local residents," he said. "This highlights the positive outcomes of the community working with police. "The person was wanted for crimes in Orange and Bourke, but it was the people of Nyngan who put him behind bars."

Police are praising the community for their assistance following the arrest of a 26-year-old Bourke male.

Police were called on Thursday morning following reports of a number of thefts from vehicles were coins had been stolen and further calls of an intruder at local home and an accommodation complex.

Police reported they spotted the suspect walking along the train line Thursday morning. After a brief pursuit on foot, police apprehended the suspect in the backyard of a Pangee Street residence.

The man was charged with numerous trespass offences, stealing from a local business and having coins in his possession suspected of being stolen from cars.

Read More – Source

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Nyngan Observer

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Temporary shop to replace drought-ravaged town’s only grocery store

A temporary supermarket will be set up in Walgett after the only grocery store in the isolated, drought-ravaged town burnt down last week. The state government will put $50,000 into the project, minister for agriculture and western NSW Adam Marshall announced yesterday while visiting the site. The money will go to the cost of renting premises and equipment such as fridges, and Walgett Shire Council will operate it while a new supermarket is built. A site for the temporary shop should be named in the next two days. Mr Marshall said locals were already doing it “incredibly tough with drought”. The town has had to rely on bore water for almost 18 months after its reservoirs reached critically low levels. “Losing their only supermarket was the last thing the community needed, leaving locals to make a 180km round trip to access the nearest supermarket and do the grocery shopping,” he said. The government and the council had set up temporary bus services to nearby towns such as Coonamble and..

A temporary supermarket will be set up in Walgett after the only grocery store in the isolated, drought-ravaged town burnt down last week. The state government will put $50,000 into the project, minister for agriculture and western NSW Adam Marshall announced yesterday while visiting the site. The money will go to the cost of renting premises and equipment such as fridges, and Walgett Shire Council will operate it while a new supermarket is built. A site for the temporary shop should be named in the next two days. Mr Marshall said locals were already doing it "incredibly tough with drought". The town has had to rely on bore water for almost 18 months after its reservoirs reached critically low levels. "Losing their only supermarket was the last thing the community needed, leaving locals to make a 180km round trip to access the nearest supermarket and do the grocery shopping," he said. The government and the council had set up temporary bus services to nearby towns such as Coonamble and Lightning Ridge, but that was "not sustainable in the long-term", he said. "The people of Walgett have had a bad run recently but I hope this … gives them some reprieve. Locals here are a resilient bunch and it has been wonderful to see locals and council band together and display such wonderful community spirit. In the meantime, many of the towns stores and service stations have stocked up on essential items so locals can still access basic goods in the short term. Love local news? Subscribe for as little as $3.75 a week to have full access to the Daily Liberal website.

A temporary supermarket will be set up in Walgett after the only grocery store in the isolated, drought-ravaged town burnt down last week.

The state government will put $50,000 into the project, minister for agriculture and western NSW Adam Marshall announced yesterday while visiting the site.

The money will go to the cost of renting premises and equipment such as fridges, and Walgett Shire Council will operate it while a new supermarket is built.

A site for the temporary shop should be named in the next two days.

Mr Marshall said locals were already doing it "incredibly tough with drought".

The town has had to rely on bore water for almost 18 months after its reservoirs reached critically low levels.

"Losing their only supermarket was the last thing the community needed, leaving locals to make a 180km round trip to access the nearest supermarket and do the grocery shopping," he said.

The government and the council had set up temporary bus services to nearby towns such as Coonamble and LightniRead More – Source

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Nyngan Observer

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A fragile chariot for a flight into history

Neil Armstrong landed safely in waist-high weeds, his parachute collapsing behind him and his wrecked craft burning on the ground. It was May 6 1968 and Armstrong was at Ellington Air Force Base near Houston, learning to fly a craft like the one he'd land on the Moon. When the first design studies began for such a vehicle it wasn't clear that a pilot would be able to control it. To research flight problems and train astronauts, NASA and Bell Aerosystems built a series of flying machines soon nicknamed 'the flying bedstead'. These craft lacked the upper structure of the real lunar module but mimicked how it would fly. Armstrong had gained his pilot's licence at age 16, flown combat jets at 21 and been a test pilot for seven years before becoming an astronaut. Flying was his life and unusual craft were nothing new to him. He was the first astronaut to fly the 'bedstead' and described it as “a contrary machine and a risky machine, but a very useful one.”..

Neil Armstrong landed safely in waist-high weeds, his parachute collapsing behind him and his wrecked craft burning on the ground. It was May 6 1968 and Armstrong was at Ellington Air Force Base near Houston, learning to fly a craft like the one he'd land on the Moon. When the first design studies began for such a vehicle it wasn't clear that a pilot would be able to control it. To research flight problems and train astronauts, NASA and Bell Aerosystems built a series of flying machines soon nicknamed 'the flying bedstead'. These craft lacked the upper structure of the real lunar module but mimicked how it would fly. Armstrong had gained his pilot's licence at age 16, flown combat jets at 21 and been a test pilot for seven years before becoming an astronaut. Flying was his life and unusual craft were nothing new to him. He was the first astronaut to fly the 'bedstead' and described it as "a contrary machine and a risky machine, but a very useful one." He'd flown it many times before that May day when problems with a couple of thrusters made him lose control of the craft and he had to bail out. The vehicle was twice redesigned and tested but astronauts were not allowed to fly it again until June 1969. Armstrong squeezed in eight more training flights just weeks before Apollo 11 launched. His practice paid off when it came to landing the real lunar module on the Moon. "I felt like I was flying something I was used to and it was doing the things that it ought to," he later said. Despite that, the final descent to the Moon's surface "was the thing that I worried about, just because it was so difficult". "That was far and away the most complex part of the flight." As well as flying the 'bedstead' astronauts also trained in a ground-based simulator. This mimicked all the systems of the real lunar module – engines, flight control, life support, navigation and communication – and was full of lights, dials, alarms and meters. It had 678 switches and 410 circuit breakers and the training engineers could make any of them fail, faking a myriad of emergencies. Armstrong and fellow astronaut Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin both spent 400 hours training on the simulator and by the time they left for the Moon they knew the lunar module inside out. The machine they would fly to the Moon's surface looked like a giant insect. It had 18 engines and eight radio systems, and was crammed with fuel tanks, life-support systems and instruments. To save weight there were no seats. The astronauts flew standing up, tethered in place. The walls were no thicker than a few sheets of paper in some areas but they were made of high-strength aluminium supported by ribs and struts, and draped with materials to insulate and protect them. The lunar module was too fragile to test on Earth so Apollo 9 and 10 put it through its paces in space. When Apollo 9 commander James McDivitt first saw it he burst out, "Holy Moses, we're really going to fly that thing?" But he and a fellow astronaut did, rehearsing manoeuvres for Apollo 11. Armstrong and his crew named their lunar module Eagle after America's national bird.

A fragile chariot for a flight into history

  • BIRD'S EYE VIEW: The lunar module being tested in Earth orbit during Apollo 9. The gold-coloured material is a man-made polymer coated with aluminium. The probes dangling from the footpads were to sense the Moons surface during touchdown and signal the crew to shut off the descent engine. Pictures: NASA

  • An early Lunar Landing Research Vehicle, aka the flying bedstead, flying above Edwards Air Force Base in California in 1965.

    An early Lunar Landing Research Vehicle, aka the flying bedstead, flying above Edwards Air Force Base in California in 1965.

  • Apollo 11 commander Neil Armstrong in the lunar module simulator, June 19 1969.

    Apollo 11 commander Neil Armstrong in the lunar module simulator, June 19 1969.

  • A 1960s graphic showing the lunar modules components.

    A 1960s graphic showing the lunar modules components.

  • The ascent stage of a lunar module during construction, before the heat shielding had been put on. The underlying structure was titanium and aluminium.

    The ascent stage of a lunar module during construction, before the heat shielding had been put on. The underlying structure was titanium and aluminium.

Training for the flight

Neil Armstrong landed safely in waist-high weeds, his parachute collapsing behind him and his wrecked craft burning on the ground.

It was May 6 1968 and Armstrong was at Ellington Air Force Base near Houston, learning to fly a craft like the one he'd land on the Moon.

When the first design studies began for such a vehicle it wasn't clear that a pilot would be able to control it.

To research flight problems and train astronauts, NASA and Bell Aerosystems built a series of flying machines soon nicknamed 'the flying bedstead'.

These craft lacked the upper structure of the real lunar module but mimicked how it would fly.

Armstrong had gained his pilot's licence at age 16, flown combat jets at 21 and been Read More – Source

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Margaret River Mail

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Service NSW hits a century in Nyngan

Access to government services just got a whole lot better for people in Nyngan and surrounds. Minister for Customer Service Victor Dominello was in Nyngan on Friday to officially open the governments 100th Service centre in NSW. “This is a monumental occasion, and the fact that we're in beautiful Nyngan is really symbolic, because it means that Service is not just for the the town and city, it's for everyone and that's why this opening in Nyngan is very symbolic,” he said. “Today we've hit a century, and there are more centres on the way across NSW.” Mr Dominello said that Service NSW has transformed how customers interact with the government, creating a one-stop shop. READ ALSO: “Gone are the bad old days of waiting in long queues and rushing all over town to get things done. The customer is now front and centre of service delivery and we have more to do,” Mr Dominello said. Service NSW worker Sue Bartley said they are “proud” to be offering a state of the art buil..

Access to government services just got a whole lot better for people in Nyngan and surrounds. Minister for Customer Service Victor Dominello was in Nyngan on Friday to officially open the governments 100th Service centre in NSW. "This is a monumental occasion, and the fact that we're in beautiful Nyngan is really symbolic, because it means that Service is not just for the the town and city, it's for everyone and that's why this opening in Nyngan is very symbolic," he said. "Today we've hit a century, and there are more centres on the way across NSW." Mr Dominello said that Service NSW has transformed how customers interact with the government, creating a one-stop shop. READ ALSO: "Gone are the bad old days of waiting in long queues and rushing all over town to get things done. The customer is now front and centre of service delivery and we have more to do," Mr Dominello said. Service NSW worker Sue Bartley said they are "proud" to be offering a state of the art building to the residents of Nyngan. "It's been really, really exciting and very daunting," she said. "We're just so proud and happy to be able to offer a state of the art building to the community of Nyngan compared to where we were in the old RMS office, it's pretty flash down here." The new building is a hub for surrounding towns to access to government services,including driver's licences, NSW Seniors Cards, birth certificates and maritime services, without the need to travel to Dubbo. Ms Bartley is inviting the community to come and check out the new building "Even if you don't have any business, come in and have a look, because at the end of the day it's their centre." Since the first centre opened in 2013, Service NSW has assisted more than 174 million customers in store, by phone and online and there have been 4.3 million MyServiceNSW Accounts created. Further information on Service NSW is available at www.service.nsw.gov.au

Service NSW hits a century in Nyngan

Access to government services just got a whole lot better for people in Nyngan and surrounds.

Minister for Customer Service Victor Dominello was in Nyngan on Friday to officially open the governments 100th Service centre in NSW.

"This is a monumental occasion, and the fact that we're in beautiful Nyngan is really symbolic, because it means that Service is not just for the the town and city, it's for everyone and that's why this opening in Nyngan is very symbolic," he said.

"Today we've hit a century, and there are more centres on the way across NSW."

Mr Dominello said that Service NSW has transformed how customers interact with the government, creating a one-stop shop.

READ ALSO:

"Gone are the bad old days of waiting in long queues and rushing all over town to get things done. The customer is now front and centre of service deliRead More – Source

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