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Measles alert for Busselton

Western Australians are being asked to be alert to the risk of measles following a confirmed measles illness in a person who visited four public venues in Busselton last week. Children and adults who have been inadvertently exposed are at risk of developing measles if they are not already immune. Individuals should remain vigilant for the onset of measles symptoms during the period July 12 to 25, 2019 if they attended: According to the WA Country Health Service's Dr Tania Wallace, measles is a serious and highly contagious viral illness that spreads when infected people cough and sneeze. “Being in the same room around the same time as someone with measles can result in infection in people who are not immune,” she said. “People with measles typically develop symptoms approximately 10 to 18 days after exposure. “Early symptoms include fever, cough, runny nose and sore eyes, followed by a red blotchy rash three or four days later. “The rash usually starts on the face and spreads to t..

Western Australians are being asked to be alert to the risk of measles following a confirmed measles illness in a person who visited four public venues in Busselton last week. Children and adults who have been inadvertently exposed are at risk of developing measles if they are not already immune. Individuals should remain vigilant for the onset of measles symptoms during the period July 12 to 25, 2019 if they attended: According to the WA Country Health Service's Dr Tania Wallace, measles is a serious and highly contagious viral illness that spreads when infected people cough and sneeze. "Being in the same room around the same time as someone with measles can result in infection in people who are not immune," she said. "People with measles typically develop symptoms approximately 10 to 18 days after exposure. "Early symptoms include fever, cough, runny nose and sore eyes, followed by a red blotchy rash three or four days later. "The rash usually starts on the face and spreads to the rest of the body." Dr Wallace said complications following measles can be serious and include ear infections and pneumonia in about 10 per cent of cases. "Around one in every five people will require hospital admission and about one person in every 1,000 will develop encephalitis – inflammation of the brain," she said. Dr Wallace said the WA Country Health Service was urging parents to make sure their children receive their measles vaccinations on schedule. People born during or after 1966 are also requested to check that they have had two documented doses of a measles vaccine at some stage in their life, especially before travelling overseas. If they are not sure if they have had two doses of measles vaccine, they should see their doctor for a vaccination before going abroad. There is also a newly funded adult measles immunisation campaign offering two doses of vaccine for all people born from 1966 who are not immunised. Vaccinations can be provided by your GP or your usual immunisation provider. Dr Wallace said every measles case is treated as a public health emergency because of the risk of local spread – including to those most vulnerable to infection, such as infants too young to be vaccinated, pregnant women and those with compromised immune systems. "With high vaccination coverage, naturally occurring measles has been eliminated from WA for around 20 years, but occasional cases and small outbreaks occur, sparked by residents or visitors who were infected overseas," she said. People who are concerned they may have measles and require medical advice after hours can contact Healthdirect on 1800 022 222. For further information, visit the HealthyWA website (external site).

Western Australians are being asked to be alert to the risk of measles following a confirmed measles illness in a person who visited four public venues in Busselton last week.

Children and adults who have been inadvertently exposed are at risk of developing measles if they are not already immune.

Individuals should remain vigilant for the onset of measles symptoms during the period July 12 to 25, 2019 if they attended:

  • Busselton shopping precinct on July 5, 2019 in the late afternoon
  • Busselton Post Office on Prince Street on July 5, 2019 in the late afternoon
  • Discount Pharmacy on Kent Street on Friday July, 5 and Sunday, July 7 in the late afternoon
  • Woolworths Busselton on Kent Street on Saturday July 6 in the late afternoon.

According to the WA Country Health Service's Dr Tania Wallace, measles is a serious and highly contagious viral illness that spreads when infected people cough and sneeze.

"Being in the same room around the same time as someone with measles can result in infection in people who are not immune," she said.

"People with measles typically develop symptoms approximately 10 to 18 days after exposure.

"Early symptoms include fever, cough, runny nose and sore eyes, followed by a red blotchy rash three or four days later.

"The rash usually starts on the face and spreads to the rest of the body."

Dr Wallace said complications following measles can be serious and include ear infections andRead More – Source

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How Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s Bush Summit speech went down in Dubbo

Drought-stricken farmers and their neighbours in country communities might not have heard exactly what they wanted to from Prime Minister Scott Morrison in Dubbo but many have praised him for listening to their concerns and explaining how he's helping them. “He spoke very well,” said 70-year-old Binnaway farmer Kym Monkton, who was one of about 200 people from across Western NSW who gathered in the city to see Mr Morrison speak at the Daily Telegraph's Bush Summit on Thursday. “The key thing he said was that Aussie farmers are one of the best in the world and there's a reason for that – we're unsubsidised unlike the European Union, UK and USA,” Mr Monkton said. “We cost the government very little and as a result we are very efficient because we stand on our own.” READ ALSO: Drought upgrades bring a boost to the shire Mr Monkton said while he appreciated all “the little bits and pieces” of support governments offered farmers doing it tough, he wanted to see a more “p..

Drought-stricken farmers and their neighbours in country communities might not have heard exactly what they wanted to from Prime Minister Scott Morrison in Dubbo but many have praised him for listening to their concerns and explaining how he's helping them. "He spoke very well," said 70-year-old Binnaway farmer Kym Monkton, who was one of about 200 people from across Western NSW who gathered in the city to see Mr Morrison speak at the Daily Telegraph's Bush Summit on Thursday. "The key thing he said was that Aussie farmers are one of the best in the world and there's a reason for that – we're unsubsidised unlike the European Union, UK and USA," Mr Monkton said. "We cost the government very little and as a result we are very efficient because we stand on our own." READ ALSO: Drought upgrades bring a boost to the shire Mr Monkton said while he appreciated all "the little bits and pieces" of support governments offered farmers doing it tough, he wanted to see a more "permanent fix". "I'd like to see the introduction of a national water and fodder scheme," he said. "I'd also like to see the Bradfield Scheme embraced, that's about diverting coastal waters inland." Massive pipelines should be constructed to transfer water from places like the Ord River in Western Australia to drier communities susceptible to drought, Mr Monkton believes. "Irrigation is the key to agriculture and agriculture is key to the economy," he said. "We are the driest continent in the world and we're getting drier. Most of our average annual rainfalls have decreased since 2000." During his 30-minute speech, Mr Morrison spoke about the billions of dollars his government had already spent helping farmers and country communities. READ ALSO: Saleyards intersection to receive major upgrades More support through the farm household allowance, funding to manage pests and weeds, extra mental health assistance and money for charities supporting vulnerable communities were among the measures already being delivered, Mr Morrison said. Country councils have also been provided with up to $1 million in funding. "The Dubbo Regional Council used its funding to invest in the Stuart Town water supply, the installation of shades for the Dubbo Livestock Markets and an ambulatory toilet facility here in the CBD," Mr Morrison told the audience. READ ALSO: Dubbo indebted to 'extraordinary man' and his incredible goal He said the establishment of a future drought fund and passage of anti-trespass laws to prevent farms from being invaded by "utterly disgraceful cowardly keyboard warriors" would also help support people on the land. "We know our climate is changing and we know the drought has always been apart of the Australian landscape, we know this drought won't be the last and that's why we're establishing a future drought fund," Mr Morrison said. A permanent soil advocate will also be introduced to help farmers improve profitability and boost water storage by addressing climate challenges and poor management practices that impact on soil quality. "The stuff on soil was good, that's such a critical aspect," Dubbo resident Sally Larkings said after she watched the speech. Mr Morrison's message that the future of Australia depended on the success of country communities was also spot on, she said. After the speech Mr Morrison took a range of questions from the floor about extra roads funding, the Murray Darling Basin Plan, subsidies and population growth. In response Mr Morrison said if more subsidies for things like fodder were introduced that would push up the price and the Murray Darling Basin Plan could not be changed unless the states agreed. Attracting more migrants to country areas and diversifying the economy would help with population growth, he said. A large amount of money is also being invested in roads and the "the bush is not broken, the bush is surviving and the bush will thrive", Mr Morrison said. Five panel discussions featuring a range of prominent community, business, political and industry leaders are now taking place at the day-long summit. Topics such as regional jobs, tourism, transport, water and land management will be discussed.

OUTLINING WORK: Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks at the Bush Summit in Dubbo. Photo: BELINDA SOOLE

Drought-stricken farmers and their neighbours in country communities might not have heard exactly what they wanted to from Prime Minister Scott Morrison in Dubbo but many have praised him for listening to their concerns and explaining how he's helping them.

"He spoke very well," said 70-year-old Binnaway farmer Kym Monkton, who was one of about 200 people from across Western NSW who gathered in the city to see Mr Morrison speak at the Daily Telegraph's Bush Summit on Thursday.

"The key thing he said was that Aussie farmers are one of the best in the world and there's a reason for that – we're unsubsidised unlike the European Union, UK and USA," Mr Monkton said.

"We cost the government very little and as a result we are very efficient because we stand on our own."

Mr Monkton said while he appreciated all "the little bits and pieces" of support governments offered farmers doing it tough, he wanted to see a more "permanent fix".

"I'd like to see the introduction of a national water and fodder scheme," he said.

"I'd also like to see the Bradfield Scheme embraced, that's about diverting coastal waters inland."

PROVIDING FEEDBACK: Kym Monkton at the Bush Summit. Photo: RYAN YOUNG

PROVIDING FEEDBACK: Kym Monkton at the Bush Summit. Photo: RYAN YOUNG

Massive pipelines should be constructed to transfer water from places like the Ord River in Western Australia to drier communities susceptible to drought, Mr Monkton believes.

"Irrigation is the key to agriculture and agriculture is key to the economy," he said.

"We are the driest continent in the world and we're getting drier. Most of our average annual rainfalls have decreased since 2000."

During his 30-minute speech, Mr Morrison spoke about the billions of dollars his government had already spent helping farmers and country communities.

More support through the farm household allowance, funding to manage pests and weeds, extra mental health assistance and money for charities supporting vulnerable communities were among the measures already being delivered, Mr Morrison said.

Country councils have also been provided with up to $1 million in funding.

"The Dubbo Regional Council used its funding to invest in the Stuart Town water supply, the installation of shades for the Dubbo Livestock Markets and an ambulatory toilet facility here in the CBD," Mr Morrison told the audience.

He said the establishment of a future drought fund and passage of anti-trespass laws to prevent farms from being invaded by "utterly disgraceful cowardly keyboard warriors" would also help support people on the land.

"We know our climate is changing and we know the drought has always been apart of the Australian landscape, we know this drought won't be the last and that's why we're establishing a future drought fund," Mr Morrison said.

Read More – Source

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Study reveals Geographe Bay’s whale nursery

Read more: Whales take a quick break in Flinders Bay Evidence of a southern right whale aggregation area has been discovered in Geographe Bay by a team of dedicated researchers at Point Piquet. Southwest Whale Ecology Study scientist Chris Burton will present the research team's findings at the 2019 Australian Marine Sciences Association's conference in Fremantle. Mr Burton said the research was conducted with Sandra Salgado from Oceans Blueprint, Brodie Elsdon and photographers Ian Wiese and Blair Ranford. “We will be presenting evidence that southern right whales have been coming into Geographe Bay for years,” he said. “We have land based sightings to show that from the last 15 years, and in the last couple of years there have been more 2018 was huge, there were almost as three times as many sightings. “There were about 20 to 30 from our land based station at Point Piquet.” Mr Burton said it was great because southern right whales were still endangered in Australian waters…

Read more: Whales take a quick break in Flinders Bay Evidence of a southern right whale aggregation area has been discovered in Geographe Bay by a team of dedicated researchers at Point Piquet. Southwest Whale Ecology Study scientist Chris Burton will present the research team's findings at the 2019 Australian Marine Sciences Association's conference in Fremantle. Mr Burton said the research was conducted with Sandra Salgado from Oceans Blueprint, Brodie Elsdon and photographers Ian Wiese and Blair Ranford. "We will be presenting evidence that southern right whales have been coming into Geographe Bay for years," he said. "We have land based sightings to show that from the last 15 years, and in the last couple of years there have been more 2018 was huge, there were almost as three times as many sightings. "There were about 20 to 30 from our land based station at Point Piquet." Mr Burton said it was great because southern right whales were still endangered in Australian waters. "It is important to get the word out about how important Geographe and Flinders Bays are, all the whales go to Flinders Bay in their northern migration and Geographe Bay gets the whales in their southern migration," he said "They come in for resting, with the southern rights Geographe Bay is actually a nursery, the females are nursing their calves, and the males are looking for unaccompanied females, they just chill out. "There are threats to whales and one of them is boat traffic and underwater noise, we have seen quite a few incidents with people on jet skis and boats just hammer around the whales "You can see them getting disturbed, more importantly with southern rights because there are so few of them, and if they do get disturbed all the time they will not come here. "People need to know not to drive really fast during the whale season and really keep a lookout for whales, because you do not want to hit one." Mr Burton said there had been really good research done in Australia which found two-sub populations of southern right whales. "It is pretty exciting, we saw all these southern right whales last year and after looking at the plan they describe aggregation areas," he said. "There are three huge aggregation areas along the West Coast including Doubtful Island, Twilight Cove and the head of the Bight in SA. "In between that there are all these little bays, traditionally they spread out before they were hunted. "They used to go to Geographe Bay and off Perth and everywhere, then they were slaughtered somewhere between 30,000 and 70,000. "They left around 300 southern right whales. "The southern right whale population in the western part of southern Australia is going pretty well. It has come up to 2900 and on the eastern side of Australia their population has been really slow to recover, there are less than 500. "As the population builds they find new habitat and spread out, some of them are now coming up to Geographe Bay. They have been going to Flinders Bay for a while and that has been described as an emerging aggregation area. "After last year with over 100 sightings we have been completing the catalogue of locally identified whales."

Study reveals Geographe Bay's whale nursery

  • Evidence of a southern right whale aggregation area has been discovered in Geographe Bay. Photo by Ian Wiese.

  • Southern right whales mating off Gannet Rock. Photo by Ian Wiese.

    Southern right whales mating off Gannet Rock. Photo by Ian Wiese.

  • Mother southern right whale (below) and an unusual colored calf in Eagle Bay. Photo by Ian Wiese taken in September 2018.

    Mother southern right whale (below) and an unusual colored calf in Eagle Bay. Photo by Ian Wiese taken in September 2018.

Evidence of a southern right whale aggregation area has been discovered in Geographe Bay by a team of dedicated researchers at Point Piquet.

Southwest Whale Ecology Study scientist Chris Burton will present the research team's findings at the 2019 Australian Marine Sciences Association's conference in Fremantle.

Mr Burton said the research was conducted with Sandra Salgado from Oceans Blueprint, Brodie Elsdon and photographers Ian Wiese and Blair Ranford.

"We will be presenting evidence that southern right whales have been coming into Geographe Bay for years," he said.

"We have land based sightings to show that from the last 15 years, and in the last couple of years there have been more 2018 was huge, there were almost as three times as many sightings.

"There were about 20 to 30 from our land based station at Point Piquet."

Mr Burton said it was great because southern right whales were still endangered in Australian waters.

"It is important to get the word out about how imporRead More – Source

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Bogan Shire community projects need your vote

A number of projects in the Barwon electorate have the opportunity to receive state government funding, however, unlike most grants, their success is entirely dependent on the community's support. Two projects in the Bogan Shire have been submitted as part of the My Community Project grants program, which aims to fund projects in each NSW electorate to help improve the wellbeing of the people and communities that live there. Up to $260,000 of funding is available to each electorate, with grants of between $20,000 and $200,000 to be awarded to the projects that receive the most support via community votes. The first project nominated in the Barwon electorate is the restoration of Nyngan's historic 1924 Garford Fire Engine for permanent display and to be featured in events and processions. The fire engine was used by the Nyngan Fire Brigade from 1943 until 1963, however was damaged in the 1990 flood. The project involves re-painting the Garford engine which is expected to be co..

A number of projects in the Barwon electorate have the opportunity to receive state government funding, however, unlike most grants, their success is entirely dependent on the community's support. Two projects in the Bogan Shire have been submitted as part of the My Community Project grants program, which aims to fund projects in each NSW electorate to help improve the wellbeing of the people and communities that live there. Up to $260,000 of funding is available to each electorate, with grants of between $20,000 and $200,000 to be awarded to the projects that receive the most support via community votes. The first project nominated in the Barwon electorate is the restoration of Nyngan's historic 1924 Garford Fire Engine for permanent display and to be featured in events and processions. The fire engine was used by the Nyngan Fire Brigade from 1943 until 1963, however was damaged in the 1990 flood. The project involves re-painting the Garford engine which is expected to be completed by a local auto spray painter using authentic colours, authentic tyres will be sourced from a specialist tyre dealer, the signage work will be done by a qualified sign writer using brush and paint on letter to ensure it is fitting with the original work on the engine. Currently the old Nyngan fire station in Cobar Street has been restored to house the engine, which will add another element of history to the community. The second project nominated is the rejuvenation of the Hermidale memorial park and play equipment. Work will include repairing the existing equipment and structures, purchasing and installing a play gym, installing adequate fences and gardens. The project aims to boost the community heavily impacted by drought, and will provide a safer and more enjoyable environment for families and children. Successful projects are determined through a public vote and the projects that receive the most support will receive funding. Voting closes on August 15, with successful projects to be announced from September 2019. More information on each project can be found on the My Service NSW website www.service.nsw.gov.au. People will need a MyServiceNSW Account and your Medicare card to vote. Voters need to pick between three and five projects in their electorate, arrange them in order of preference and then submit the vote. Each person can only vote once. Voting can be done online at www.service.nsw.gov.au or at your nearest Service NSW Centre. Call 13 77 88 for more information.

Bogan Shire community projects need your vote

  • Bogan Shire community projects need your vote

A number of projects in the Barwon electorate have the opportunity to receive state government funding, however, unlike most grants, their success is entirely dependent on the community's support.

Two projects in the Bogan Shire have been submitted as part of the My Community Project grants program, which aims to fund projects in each NSW electorate to help improve the wellbeing of the people and communities that live there.

Up to $260,000 of funding is available to each electorate, with grants of between $20,000 and $200,000 to be awarded to the projects that receive the most support via community votes.

The first project nominated in the Barwon electorate is the restoration of Nyngan's historic 1924 Garford Fire Engine for permanent display and to be featured in events and processions.

The fire engine was used by the Nyngan Fire Brigade from 1943 until 1963, however was damaged in the 1990 flood.

The project involves re-painting the Garford engine which is expected to be completed by a local auto spray painter using authentic colours, authentic tyres will be sourced from a specialist tyre dealer, the signage work will be done by a qualified sign writer using brush and paiRead More – Source

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