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A high-level delegation visited Yei River State to intensify Ebola preparedness in Sudan

Juba, 16 July 2019 – On 15 July 2019, a high-level delegation led by Dr Makur Matur Kariom, Undersec..

Juba, 16 July 2019 – On 15 July 2019, a high-level delegation led by Dr Makur Matur Kariom, Undersecretary, Ministry of Health and Mr Alain Noudehou, UN Resident/Humanitarian Coordinator and comprising Ambassadors of donor countries, heads of United Nations (UN) agencies, , and Representatives of international non-governmental organizations visited Yei town.

The objective of the visit was to among others reassure local authorities of the continued support of the development partners and the one UN in South Sudan; secure sustained commitment of the local authorities to the EVD preparedness efforts and publicize in the national press key messages to the general public regarding Ebola preparedness.
South Sudan is one of the four priority one countries (Burundi, Rwanda, South Sudan, Uganda) prioritized by WHO to enhance preparedness and operational readiness based on the proximity to the outbreak area as well as the capacity to manage Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreaks in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

The risk of transmission of EVD into countries that share borders with DRC, including South Sudan, has been classified as “very high” by WHO. Cases of EVD have recently been confirmed in Uganda, Goma and in Ariwara, a town in DRC located just 70km from the border with South Sudan.

“Diseases such as Ebola dont respect boundaries, race or religion so all must ensure that they work together to prevent its cross border transmission into South Sudan”, said Mr Noudehou. He also reiterated the commitment of the UN to continue to support EVD preparedness in the country under the leadership of WHO.

As a priority one country for EVD preparedness, the Ministry of Health, National Task Force, WHO and partners are implementing the National EVD Preparedness Plan, including vaccinating front-line health workers, educating people about prevention and response measures, conducting screening at multiple locations to help with early detection of cases, training personnel in infection prevention and control as well as being preparing for safe and dignified burial processes if needed.

“Although South Sudan has not confirmed any EVD case, implementation of effective public health measures is critical to manage the risk posed by South Sudans complex humanitarian context, the history of previous (EVD) outbreaks, increasing global travel and proximity to DRC”, said Dr Olushayo Olu, WHO Country Representative to South Sudan.

At the end of the visit, the Governor of the state, the state Health Ministry and partners on the ground reiterated their commitment to intensify key interventions and increase public awareness by providing adequate information through all communication channels, religious and community leaders.

In his closing remarks, the Undersecretary, Dr Makur appreciated WHO and other partners for the strong partnership and support rendered to enhance capacities to effectively implement the International Health Regulations (IHR, 2005) and address the threats of EVD and other infectious diseases.

Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) is one of the most fatal and highly infectious diseases known to the world. The on-going outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is the second largest outbreak reported globally. As of 13 July 2019, 2 489 confirmed cases and 1 665 deaths have been reported.

WHO is working in Jubek, Gbudue, Tambura, Maridi, Torit, Wau and Yei River states alongside their respective state health ministries and partners to provide strategic public health leadership and support required to ensure that all the high-risk counties are operationally ready and prepared to implement timely and effective EVD risk mitigation, detection, and response measures.

Delegates arrived in Yei town
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What Are the Risks of Dehydration?

 

Whether you are working outside, participating in a sport, or simply having a hot day, it’s important to know how to prevent dehydration. The effects of dehydration can range from mild to serious. The symptoms of dehydration can also resemble other health problems. Dehydration can be prevented by drinking a lot of water.

If you are experiencing symptoms of dehydration, such as fatigue, dizziness, headache, or dry mouth, make sure to drink plenty of fluids. You may also need to add electrolytes to your fluids. These will help your body work properly.

Dehydration can occur from vomiting or diarrhea. Children who have diarrhea should drink extra water. You may also need to give your child oral rehydration solution.

If you have a chronic illness, you may not be able to drink enough fluids. This can be caused by your illness, medications, or health condition. If you feel you are dehydrated, you should talk with your doctor.

If you work outside, you may have a higher risk of dehydration. This is because you are more likely to sweat. The fluids you drink should be increased when you are sweating.

Children also lose more water when they are in the hotter weather. They also lose more water when they have a high fever. This is why you should drink more water when you have a fever.

When you are working outdoors, you should also drink more fluids than you normally do. This is especially important if you have been sick. The flu is one of the most common reasons people get dehydrated.

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Risks of COVID-19 Infection

 

Several studies have found that patients with COVID-19 have a higher rate of digestive complications. These symptoms include diarrhea, anorexia, ileus, abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. The severity of these symptoms can increase with time.

Researchers at Stanford University discovered that COVID-19 patients shed SARS-CoV-2 RNA in their faeces for months after infection. Approximately half of patients in the study had faecal RNA. It is not yet clear how the virus interacts with the intestinal tissue of COVID-19 patients.

Other studies have found that people with COVID-19 who have digestive symptoms are more likely to have cardiac abnormalities and acute heart damage. They also have a higher rate of death from their condition.

Research published in November 2020 found a connection between COVID-19 GI symptoms and acute respiratory distress. People who develop respiratory distress after developing GI symptoms are at risk of developing pneumonia, respiratory failure, and tracheal intubation.

In a small case series from Wuhan, China, diarrhea was present in 10.8% of patients. The onset of diarrhea was usually between one and eight days after infection. The mean onset was 3.3 days.

Another study found that the ACE2 receptor, which is a protein that helps the virus enter cells, was high in people who had diarrhea. The high levels of the receptor caused inflammation in the small intestine. It is unclear whether COVID-19 can damage the lining of the stomach, making it more susceptible to infections.

In addition, people with COVID-19 may have trouble absorbing fluid and fluid can get into the bloodstream, leading to pneumonia. This is known as post-infectious dysmotility.

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Monkeypox: First deaths outside Africa in Brazil and Spain

Brazil and Spain have reported their first monkeypox deaths.

A 41-year-old man in Brazil became the first fatality from the virus outside Africa. Spain announced two deaths soon afterwards – the first in Europe.

Last week, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the monkeypox outbreak a global health emergency.

But infections are usually mild and the risk to the general population is low.

On Friday Brazil’s health ministry said the victim there had suffered from lymphoma and a weakened immune system, and “comorbidities aggravated his condition”.

Brazil has so far reported 1,066 confirmed cases and 513 suspected cases of the virus. Data from Brazil’s health ministry indicates that more than 98% of confirmed cases were in men who have sex with men.

Shortly afterwards, Spain’s health ministry confirmed Europe’s first death from the virus – a patient who suffered from encephalitis.

A second death linked to monkeypox was confirmed by Spanish authorities on Saturday.

The health ministry said that of 3,750 monkeypox patients with available information, 120 or 3.2% had been hospitalised.

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are 21,148 cases worldwide.

The monkeypox virus is a member of the same family of viruses as smallpox, although it is much less severe and experts say chances of infection are low.

It occurs mostly in remote parts of central and west African countries, near tropical rainforests.

Health officials are recommending people at highest risk of exposure to the virus – including some gay and bisexual men, as well as some healthcare workers – should be offered a vaccine.

Last week, WHO director general Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said declaring the outbreak a global health emergency would help speed up the development of vaccines and the implementation of measures to limit the spread of the virus.

Dr Tedros said the risk of monkeypox is moderate globally, but high in Europe.

But, he added, “this is an outbreak that can be stopped with the right strategies in the right groups”. The WHO is issuing recommendations, which it hopes will spur countries to take action to stop transmission of the virus and protect those most at risk.

 

Read from: https://www.bbc.com/news/health-62350022

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