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Is weedkiller Roundup a ‘necessary evil’

An experienced bush regenerator says the “baby should not be thrown out with the bathwater” over concerns about the herbicide glyphosate. Suzanne Pritchard, president of Coal Point Progress Association's Landcare group, said there needs to be “an informed discussion” about use of the contentious chemical. “It is an extremely important tool for control of weeds,” said Ms Pritchard, who has been in Landcare for more than 20 years. A ban on glyphosate would affect weed control that enables biodiversity to survive. “The pool of plants would be diminished. We'd end up with a lot of weeds in future. We become a lesser society if we can't care for native plants and the animals that depend on them.” The glyphosate brand and weedkiller Roundup has been making world headlines over lawsuits in the US. In May, a Californian jury ordered chemical giant Monsanto to pay $2.8 billion to a couple who say they contracted cancer from using Roundup on their garden for more than 30 years. A ..

An experienced bush regenerator says the "baby should not be thrown out with the bathwater" over concerns about the herbicide glyphosate. Suzanne Pritchard, president of Coal Point Progress Association's Landcare group, said there needs to be "an informed discussion" about use of the contentious chemical. "It is an extremely important tool for control of weeds," said Ms Pritchard, who has been in Landcare for more than 20 years. A ban on glyphosate would affect weed control that enables biodiversity to survive. "The pool of plants would be diminished. We'd end up with a lot of weeds in future. We become a lesser society if we can't care for native plants and the animals that depend on them." The glyphosate brand and weedkiller Roundup has been making world headlines over lawsuits in the US. In May, a Californian jury ordered chemical giant Monsanto to pay $2.8 billion to a couple who say they contracted cancer from using Roundup on their garden for more than 30 years. A lawyer for the couple, Michael Miller, said homeowners were more at risk than professional gardeners because they were never told to wear any protective gloves or clothing. It was the third case the company had lost. In all three cases, the victims asserted that long-term use of Roundup caused their non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The other two cases involved a school groundskeeper and a gardener on an acreage. The corporate giant Bayer, which owns Monsanto, is facing more than 11,000 similar cases in the US. It has repeatedly declared that the chemical is safe. Councils across Australia have been reassessing their use of glyphosate. A City of Newcastle spokesperson said the council had begun assessing its weed-control needs to "determine the most effective alternative to glyphosate". This covered maintenance of roads and parks. The spokesperson said councillors had approved a move to "phase out use of the herbicide". The council was seeking further information to "determine the best way forward" and would "keep the public informed on the phase out as it takes place." A Maitland council spokesperson said the council uses glyphosate products "as per the label". It ensures protective equipment is worn and does "health testing on staff using these products". The spokesperson said there were other options to treat weeds in some circumstances. "However, there are some weeds that need glyphosate-based products for effective treatment," it said. Some councils, including Byron Shire, are trialling "steam weeding" to reduce their chemical use. It involves pressurising water to boiling point and then targeting weeds with an applicator. Glyphosate has been in use for 40 years. If it ends up being banned, Ms Pritchard believes another product will fill the void. "Is it better the devil you know and you manage that? "Or do you get a new kid on the block and go through the whole cycle again to see what happens." Some Landcare groups have been cautious with glyphosate. For example, instead of spraying the weedkiller, some groups were advised to cut plants at their base and paint it on the remaining part. As well as bushcare and gardening, glyphosate is widely used in farming – including in the Hunter – to kill weeds and grasses that compete with crops. Comment was sought from the state agency, Local Land Services, which runs the Hunter Regional Weed Committee. A spokeswoman referred the Newcastle Herald to the federal Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority. The authority said it was actively monitoring any new scientific information about glyphosate. It remained satisfied that the products it had approved containing glyphosate "can continue to be used safely according to label directions". It said this position was "aligned with other international regulators". Australian Association of Bush Regenerators president Tein McDonald said concern had been increasing about glyphosate use since 2016. This was when the International Agency for Research on Cancer reclassified glyphosate as "probably carcinogenic to humans". "This concern has only increased after successful litigation in the US by cancer patients," she said. "It is essential, indeed legally mandatory, for employers to take all reasonable steps to protect the health of workers," she said. "However, we also need to ask ourselves whether consideration of withdrawing from the use of glyphosate is based more on fear of litigation than sound evidence of glyphosate toxicology." She said this was particularly so, if juries were "influenced by anti-Monsanto campaigning". "This campaigning, while well-intentioned and partly correct, unfortunately conflates criticism of Monsanto's genetic modification of food crops to ensure they are 'Roundup ready' with criticism of the chemical itself. "Such conflation does not progress our journey towards finding out the truth about glyphosate toxicology for users involved in ecological restoration." She said bush regenerators "do not want to discard a highly important tool from our conservation toolbox without sound justification".

An experienced bush regenerator says the "baby should not be thrown out with the bathwater" over concerns about the herbicide glyphosate.

Suzanne Pritchard, president of Coal Point Progress Association's Landcare group, said there needs to be "an informed discussion" about use of the contentious chemical.

"It is an extremely important tool for control of weeds," said Ms Pritchard, who has been in Landcare for more than 20 years.

A ban on glyphosate would affect weed control that enables biodiversity to survive.

"The pool of plants would be diminished. We'd end up with a lot of weeds in future. We become a lesser society if we can't care for native plants and the animals that depend on them."

The glyphosate brand and weedkiller Roundup has been making world headlines over lawsuits in the US.

In May, a Californian jury ordered chemical giant Monsanto to pay $2.8 billion to a couple who say they contracted cancer from using Roundup on their garden for more than 30 years.

A lawyer for the couple, Michael Miller, said homeowners were more at risk than professional gardeners because they were never told to wear any protective gloves or clothing.

It was the third case the company had lost. In all three cases, the victims asserted that long-term use of Roundup caused their non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The other two cases involved a school groundskeeper and a gardener on an acreage.

The corporate giant Bayer, which owns Monsanto, is facing more than 11,000 similar cases in the US.

It has repeatedly declared that the chemical is safe.

On the Shelf: Roundup on sale at a Coles supermarket.

Councils across Australia have been reassessing their use of glyphosate.

A City of Newcastle spokesperson said the council had begun assessing its weed-control needs to "determine the most effective alternative to glyphosate".

This covered maintenance of roads and parks.

The spokesperson said councillors had approved a move to "phase out use of the herbicide".

The council was seeking further information to "determine the best way forward" and would "keep the public informed on the phase out as it takes place."

A Maitland council spokesperson said the council uses glyphosate products "as per the label".

It enRead More – Source

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Meteoric Resources drilling intersects high-grade gold shoot below Juruena resource

Meteoric Resources NL (ASX:MEI) has intersected a high-grade gold shoot below the current Juruena resource as part of the companys maiden drilling program across its Brazilian portfolio.

Drill hole JUDD022 targeted the southern high‐grade gold shoot at the Dona Maria deposit intersecting 4.4 metres at 13.5 g/t gold from 300 metres including 2 metres at 27.3 g/t gold from 302 metres.

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Meteoric managing director Dr Andrew Tunks said: “This fantastic result from JUDD022 caps a remarkable maiden drilling campaign by Meteoric at Juruena which commenced with one of the best drill results in the World in 2019 of 20.6 metres at 94.9 g/t gold from 97 metres and was followed by some further stunning results during the campaign.

“To my mind, this final result is the best of the bunch as it confirms the high grade is open at depth, providing us with a host of immediate drill targets to substantially grow the Juruena resource.

“It really is only the beginning of the road fo..

Meteoric Resources NL (ASX:MEI) has intersected a high-grade gold shoot below the current Juruena resource as part of the companys maiden drilling program across its Brazilian portfolio.

Drill hole JUDD022 targeted the southern high‐grade gold shoot at the Dona Maria deposit intersecting 4.4 metres at 13.5 g/t gold from 300 metres including 2 metres at 27.3 g/t gold from 302 metres.

Meteoric managing director Dr Andrew Tunks said: “This fantastic result from JUDD022 caps a remarkable maiden drilling campaign by Meteoric at Juruena which commenced with one of the best drill results in the World in 2019 of 20.6 metres at 94.9 g/t gold from 97 metres and was followed by some further stunning results during the campaign.

“To my mind, this final result is the best of the bunch as it confirms the high grade is open at depth, providing us with a host of immediate drill targets to substantially grow the Juruena resource.

“It really is only the beginning of the road for Juruena and I cant wait to get the drill rigs turning again and see just how wide and deep the high grade mineralisation at Dona Maria extends.

“In technical terms, the results from JUDD022 confirm the interpreted continuity and steep southerly plunge of the southern high‐grade ore shoot at Dona Maria.

“JUDD022 intercepted the mineralised zone approximately 30 metres below the current Mineral Resource model and conclusively shows the mineralisation is still strong below that depth.

“We expect to commence drilling early in Q2, with the exact date dependent on the cessation of the current wet season.”

Juruena resource


The latest round of results highlights the confirmation of a high‐grade ore shoot at Dona Maria and the potential for Tomate to provide additional ounces to the Juruena resource which currently stands at 1.2 million tonnes at 6.3 g/t gold for 261,000 ounces.

MetRead More – Source

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Lake Resources to upsize share purchase plan following strong investor demand

Lake Resources NL (ASX:LKE) received a further boost for its growth plans with strong investor demand for its share purchase plan (SPP) and placement.

The companys $1.5 million SPP has been oversubscribed having secured some $2.1 million while a private placement to sophisticated and professional investors has raised a total of about $3.37.

Lake is now considering upsizing the SPP to accommodate the increased demand from shareholders, with such funding to help speed the companys development plans.

The strong investor support will facilitate the development of sustainable and scalable direct extraction technology at Lakes flagship Kachi Lithium Brine Project in Argentina.

The technology developed by Lakes partner, Lilac Solutions has received backing from a fund led by Bill Gates and other global business heavyweights and offers a potential sustainable solution for the lithium brines industry.

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Lake managing director Steve Promnitz said: “The strong investor su..

Lake Resources NL (ASX:LKE) received a further boost for its growth plans with strong investor demand for its share purchase plan (SPP) and placement.

The companys $1.5 million SPP has been oversubscribed having secured some $2.1 million while a private placement to sophisticated and professional investors has raised a total of about $3.37.

Lake is now considering upsizing the SPP to accommodate the increased demand from shareholders, with such funding to help speed the companys development plans.

The strong investor support will facilitate the development of sustainable and scalable direct extraction technology at Lakes flagship Kachi Lithium Brine Project in Argentina.

The technology developed by Lakes partner, Lilac Solutions has received backing from a fund led by Bill Gates and other global business heavyweights and offers a potential sustainable solution for the lithium brines industry.

Lake managing director Steve Promnitz said: “The strong investor support is extremely encouraging, particularly amid current market conditions, and I would like to sincerely thank both our new and existing investors for your commitment.

“Lake has some huge milestones Read More – Source

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Cardinal Resources receives water extraction permits for Namdini

Cardinal Resources Ltd (ASX:CDV) has been granted water extract permits for its Namdini Gold Project in Ghana, West Africa.

The permits allow Cardinal to extract raw water from:

The White Volta River for mining and processing purposes; and
Boreholes located within the Mining License area for mine construction and development purposes.

Cardinals chief operating officer Dave Anthony said: “These key permits will enable Cardinal to support the development and operation of the Namdini Gold Project.

“These permits allow for all year‐round water extraction from the White Volta River, as well as boreholes located on the project site.”

CEO and managing director Archie Koimtsidis added: “We are extremely grateful to the Water Resources Commission of Ghana and all involved for the approval of our Water Use Permits and ongoing water licences.

Namdini rapidly moving into development phase[hhmc]
“We are enthused with the granting of these critical permits as they are essential to the Namdini ..

Cardinal Resources Ltd (ASX:CDV) has been granted water extract permits for its Namdini Gold Project in Ghana, West Africa.

The permits allow Cardinal to extract raw water from:

  • The White Volta River for mining and processing purposes; and
  • Boreholes located within the Mining License area for mine construction and development purposes.

Cardinals chief operating officer Dave Anthony said: “These key permits will enable Cardinal to support the development and operation of the Namdini Gold Project.

“These permits allow for all year‐round water extraction from the White Volta River, as well as boreholes located on the project site.”

CEO and managing director Archie Koimtsidis added: “We are extremely grateful to the Water Resources Commission of Ghana and all involved for the approval of our Water Use Permits and ongoing water licences.

Namdini rapidly moving into development phase


“We are enthused with the granting of these critical permits as they are essential to the Namdini Project.

“With these approvals in place, there is clear demonstration of continued support for the project development from the Ghana Government.

“The Namdini Gold Project is rapidly and successfully moving into its development phase.”

Feasibility study based on US$1,350 per ounce gold


Notably, Namdinis feasibility study ascribed a post-tax net present value (NPV) of USD$590 million and an IRR of 33.2% for the proRead More – Source

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