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How Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s Bush Summit speech went down in Dubbo

Drought-stricken farmers and their neighbours in country communities might not have heard exactly what they wanted to from Prime Minister Scott Morrison in Dubbo but many have praised him for listening to their concerns and explaining how he's helping them. “He spoke very well,” said 70-year-old Binnaway farmer Kym Monkton, who was one of about 200 people from across Western NSW who gathered in the city to see Mr Morrison speak at the Daily Telegraph's Bush Summit on Thursday. “The key thing he said was that Aussie farmers are one of the best in the world and there's a reason for that – we're unsubsidised unlike the European Union, UK and USA,” Mr Monkton said. “We cost the government very little and as a result we are very efficient because we stand on our own.” READ ALSO: Drought upgrades bring a boost to the shire Mr Monkton said while he appreciated all “the little bits and pieces” of support governments offered farmers doing it tough, he wanted to see a more “p..

Drought-stricken farmers and their neighbours in country communities might not have heard exactly what they wanted to from Prime Minister Scott Morrison in Dubbo but many have praised him for listening to their concerns and explaining how he's helping them. "He spoke very well," said 70-year-old Binnaway farmer Kym Monkton, who was one of about 200 people from across Western NSW who gathered in the city to see Mr Morrison speak at the Daily Telegraph's Bush Summit on Thursday. "The key thing he said was that Aussie farmers are one of the best in the world and there's a reason for that – we're unsubsidised unlike the European Union, UK and USA," Mr Monkton said. "We cost the government very little and as a result we are very efficient because we stand on our own." READ ALSO: Drought upgrades bring a boost to the shire Mr Monkton said while he appreciated all "the little bits and pieces" of support governments offered farmers doing it tough, he wanted to see a more "permanent fix". "I'd like to see the introduction of a national water and fodder scheme," he said. "I'd also like to see the Bradfield Scheme embraced, that's about diverting coastal waters inland." Massive pipelines should be constructed to transfer water from places like the Ord River in Western Australia to drier communities susceptible to drought, Mr Monkton believes. "Irrigation is the key to agriculture and agriculture is key to the economy," he said. "We are the driest continent in the world and we're getting drier. Most of our average annual rainfalls have decreased since 2000." During his 30-minute speech, Mr Morrison spoke about the billions of dollars his government had already spent helping farmers and country communities. READ ALSO: Saleyards intersection to receive major upgrades More support through the farm household allowance, funding to manage pests and weeds, extra mental health assistance and money for charities supporting vulnerable communities were among the measures already being delivered, Mr Morrison said. Country councils have also been provided with up to $1 million in funding. "The Dubbo Regional Council used its funding to invest in the Stuart Town water supply, the installation of shades for the Dubbo Livestock Markets and an ambulatory toilet facility here in the CBD," Mr Morrison told the audience. READ ALSO: Dubbo indebted to 'extraordinary man' and his incredible goal He said the establishment of a future drought fund and passage of anti-trespass laws to prevent farms from being invaded by "utterly disgraceful cowardly keyboard warriors" would also help support people on the land. "We know our climate is changing and we know the drought has always been apart of the Australian landscape, we know this drought won't be the last and that's why we're establishing a future drought fund," Mr Morrison said. A permanent soil advocate will also be introduced to help farmers improve profitability and boost water storage by addressing climate challenges and poor management practices that impact on soil quality. "The stuff on soil was good, that's such a critical aspect," Dubbo resident Sally Larkings said after she watched the speech. Mr Morrison's message that the future of Australia depended on the success of country communities was also spot on, she said. After the speech Mr Morrison took a range of questions from the floor about extra roads funding, the Murray Darling Basin Plan, subsidies and population growth. In response Mr Morrison said if more subsidies for things like fodder were introduced that would push up the price and the Murray Darling Basin Plan could not be changed unless the states agreed. Attracting more migrants to country areas and diversifying the economy would help with population growth, he said. A large amount of money is also being invested in roads and the "the bush is not broken, the bush is surviving and the bush will thrive", Mr Morrison said. Five panel discussions featuring a range of prominent community, business, political and industry leaders are now taking place at the day-long summit. Topics such as regional jobs, tourism, transport, water and land management will be discussed.

OUTLINING WORK: Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks at the Bush Summit in Dubbo. Photo: BELINDA SOOLE

Drought-stricken farmers and their neighbours in country communities might not have heard exactly what they wanted to from Prime Minister Scott Morrison in Dubbo but many have praised him for listening to their concerns and explaining how he's helping them.

"He spoke very well," said 70-year-old Binnaway farmer Kym Monkton, who was one of about 200 people from across Western NSW who gathered in the city to see Mr Morrison speak at the Daily Telegraph's Bush Summit on Thursday.

"The key thing he said was that Aussie farmers are one of the best in the world and there's a reason for that – we're unsubsidised unlike the European Union, UK and USA," Mr Monkton said.

"We cost the government very little and as a result we are very efficient because we stand on our own."

Mr Monkton said while he appreciated all "the little bits and pieces" of support governments offered farmers doing it tough, he wanted to see a more "permanent fix".

"I'd like to see the introduction of a national water and fodder scheme," he said.

"I'd also like to see the Bradfield Scheme embraced, that's about diverting coastal waters inland."

PROVIDING FEEDBACK: Kym Monkton at the Bush Summit. Photo: RYAN YOUNG

PROVIDING FEEDBACK: Kym Monkton at the Bush Summit. Photo: RYAN YOUNG

Massive pipelines should be constructed to transfer water from places like the Ord River in Western Australia to drier communities susceptible to drought, Mr Monkton believes.

"Irrigation is the key to agriculture and agriculture is key to the economy," he said.

"We are the driest continent in the world and we're getting drier. Most of our average annual rainfalls have decreased since 2000."

During his 30-minute speech, Mr Morrison spoke about the billions of dollars his government had already spent helping farmers and country communities.

More support through the farm household allowance, funding to manage pests and weeds, extra mental health assistance and money for charities supporting vulnerable communities were among the measures already being delivered, Mr Morrison said.

Country councils have also been provided with up to $1 million in funding.

"The Dubbo Regional Council used its funding to invest in the Stuart Town water supply, the installation of shades for the Dubbo Livestock Markets and an ambulatory toilet facility here in the CBD," Mr Morrison told the audience.

He said the establishment of a future drought fund and passage of anti-trespass laws to prevent farms from being invaded by "utterly disgraceful cowardly keyboard warriors" would also help support people on the land.

"We know our climate is changing and we know the drought has always been apart of the Australian landscape, we know this drought won't be the last and that's why we're establishing a future drought fund," Mr Morrison said.

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Town’s best to take to the stage in annual concert

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Uni student’s survey aims to help boost lamb survival

Sheep producers across western NSW are being encouraged to participate in an online survey that investigates vaccination and nutritional supplementation of sheep. Former Peak Hill resident and current Charles Sturt University student, Kayla Kopp, is conducting the investigation as part of her studies. Ms Kopp's PhD at Charles Sturt's School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences is investigating the nutritional supplementation of lambing ewes and sheep producers are being asked to take part in the survey. The survey takes approximately 15 minutes and participants remain anonymous. READ ALSO: Charles Sturt students win top tertiary team at merino challenge The project is supervised Professor Michael Friend and is part of a wider body of research at the Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation, an alliance between Charles Sturt and the NSW Department of Primary Industries, that aims to improve the productivity and profitability of sheep production. “One in five lambs born in Austra..

Sheep producers across western NSW are being encouraged to participate in an online survey that investigates vaccination and nutritional supplementation of sheep. Former Peak Hill resident and current Charles Sturt University student, Kayla Kopp, is conducting the investigation as part of her studies. Ms Kopp's PhD at Charles Sturt's School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences is investigating the nutritional supplementation of lambing ewes and sheep producers are being asked to take part in the survey. The survey takes approximately 15 minutes and participants remain anonymous. READ ALSO: Charles Sturt students win top tertiary team at merino challenge The project is supervised Professor Michael Friend and is part of a wider body of research at the Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation, an alliance between Charles Sturt and the NSW Department of Primary Industries, that aims to improve the productivity and profitability of sheep production. "One in five lambs born in Australia die within days of birth, costing the industry over $1 billion each year," Professor Friend said. "Our research aims to better understand how those losses occur and to develop knowledge and tools that will help producers improve animal health and boost lamb survival." READ ALSO: Walgett's Jill Roughley, runs her property with guts and determination The survey is available online (www.surveymonkey.com/r/ lambsurvey) and sheep producers are invited to take part in the research until Saturday, August 31. Participants must be producers currently involved in the sheep industry either as farm owners or managers in NSW; must have ewes lambing on their property annually; and must have at least 50 sheep on their property. The survey builds on Miss Kopp's earlier field studies focused on nutritional supplementation and milk production. Data from the study will contribute to research on animal welfare, animal nutrition and sheep production.

Sheep producers across western NSW are being encouraged to participate in an online survey that investigates vaccination and nutritional supplementation of sheep.

Former Peak Hill resident and current Charles Sturt University student, Kayla Kopp, is conducting the investigation as part of her studies.

Ms Kopp's PhD at Charles Sturt's School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences is investigating the nutritional supplementation of lambing ewes and sheep producers are being asked to take part in the survey.

The survey takes approximately 15 minutes and participants remain anonymous.

The project is supervised Professor Michael Friend and is part of a wider body of research at the Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation, an alliance between Charles Sturt and the NSW Department of Primary Industries, that aims to improve the productivity and profitability of sheep production.

"One in five lambs born in Australia die within days of birth, costing the industry over $1 billion each year," Professor Friend said.

"Our reRead More – Source

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Margaret River’s women in wine head to New York

Three women from the Margaret River region's wine industry have been invited to New York City for the Australian Women in Wine Awards on Tuesday September 17. Finalists from the region include Vanya Cullen – who has once again been nominated for a Winemaker of the Year award – making it the second time she has received such an accolade this year. Also nominated in the Australian Women in Wines Awards were Howard Parks marketing officer Rebecca Love and Clairault Streicker cellar door person Ulrika Larsson. Ms Love has been nominated for Marketer of the Year and Ms Larsson has been nominated for Cellar Door Person of the Year. Australian Women in Wine Awards founder and chair Jane Thomson said the depth and breadth of talent entered in the awards this year made it exceptionally difficult for their judges. “It just goes to show that after five years of operation, we are continuing to attract the very best female talent in the Australian wine community,” she said. “Theirs are excepti..

Three women from the Margaret River region's wine industry have been invited to New York City for the Australian Women in Wine Awards on Tuesday September 17. Finalists from the region include Vanya Cullen – who has once again been nominated for a Winemaker of the Year award – making it the second time she has received such an accolade this year. Also nominated in the Australian Women in Wines Awards were Howard Parks marketing officer Rebecca Love and Clairault Streicker cellar door person Ulrika Larsson. Ms Love has been nominated for Marketer of the Year and Ms Larsson has been nominated for Cellar Door Person of the Year. Australian Women in Wine Awards founder and chair Jane Thomson said the depth and breadth of talent entered in the awards this year made it exceptionally difficult for their judges. "It just goes to show that after five years of operation, we are continuing to attract the very best female talent in the Australian wine community," she said. "Theirs are exceptional stories that deserve to be told and celebrated." More than 35 Australian female wine producers have been invited to the invitation only event, which will be live streamed back to Australia via the Australian Women in Wine's Facebook page. More information on the Australian Women in Wine Awards can be found at WomeninWineAwards.com.au.

Three women from the Margaret River region's wine industry have been invited to New York City for the Australian Women in Wine Awards on Tuesday September 17.

Finalists from the region include Vanya Cullen – who has once again been nominated for a Winemaker of the Year award – making it the second time she has received such an accolade this year.

Also nominated in the Australian Women in Wines Awards were Howard Parks marketing officer Rebecca Love and Clairault Streicker cellar door person Ulrika Larsson.

Ms Love has been nominated for Marketer of the Year and Ms Larsson has been nominated for CRead More – Source

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