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Nyngan artists’ feature in photo exhibition

Nyngan artists' Priscilla Lord and Stanley Lord feature in a photographic exhibition and publication, which aims to tell the stories of Aboriginal artists living across Far Western communities of NSW. The Living Arts and Culture photographic exhibition and publication is on display in Coonamble and offers a snapshot into the lives of contemporary Aboriginal artists, their towns, villages across outback NSW. The artists were photographed and interviewed by Andrew Hull who who curates the stories of contemporary Aboriginal artists. The display captures the contribution these artists are currently making to the cultural landscape of our region. Priscilla's works aim to educate children in Aboriginal art and education. She is derivative of 'dot painting', where she often finds ways to make that relevant to her experience, so the artworks sometimes are a combination of contemporary and traditional styles. “I'm 'dot mad'. I can just sit for hours and paint ..

Nyngan artists' Priscilla Lord and Stanley Lord feature in a photographic exhibition and publication, which aims to tell the stories of Aboriginal artists living across Far Western communities of NSW. The Living Arts and Culture photographic exhibition and publication is on display in Coonamble and offers a snapshot into the lives of contemporary Aboriginal artists, their towns, villages across outback NSW. The artists were photographed and interviewed by Andrew Hull who who curates the stories of contemporary Aboriginal artists. The display captures the contribution these artists are currently making to the cultural landscape of our region. Priscilla's works aim to educate children in Aboriginal art and education. She is derivative of 'dot painting', where she often finds ways to make that relevant to her experience, so the artworks sometimes are a combination of contemporary and traditional styles. "I'm 'dot mad'. I can just sit for hours and paint my stories using dots – I can get lost in there, and the whole night can go by while I've been working on a painting," she said in the publication. READ ALSO: Priscilla uses her art to open conversations and allow for people to talk and share their stories and experience. The effect is one of a truly modern Aboriginal circumstance – one that describes the world she lives in, not a past that she has been taken away from, or a future that she doesn't know. "We share by doing. It's all there if people want to see it," she said. Stanley has moved around a lot, and learned a lot as he went. He observed his Aunties and Uncles making art when he was young, moving between Walgett, Lightning Ridge, Brewarrina, Coonamble and, ultimately, Nyngan. "I just like painting. Once I start I just sit there and keep going," his publication read. Stan's paintings hang in many significant regional government buildings such as the Nyngan Local Aboriginal Land Council, the Department of Community Services in Coonabarabran, and the Nyngan Hospital. "I didn't do much until I moved here. I was taking care of my grandkids and I just started as a way to pass some time, but people started buying them and so I just kept going," he said. His art style is unique, incorporating all that he has observed and experienced; wood burning, painting on wood, and work on skins enhance his work with acrylic on canvas. "I'll keep going as long as I can – as long as I'm still here," Stanley said. "We hope this publication not only provides a physical space to celebrate these artists but also ensures the continued support and success of our region's Aboriginal artists," Outback Arts Executive director, Jamie-Lea Trindall said.

ON DISPLAY: Artists Priscilla Lord and Stan Lord with Orana Arts board member Veneta Dutton (middle) in Coonamble. Photo: CONTRIBUTED

Nyngan artists' Priscilla Lord and Stanley Lord feature in a photographic exhibition and publication, which aims to tell the stories of Aboriginal artists living across Far Western communities of NSW.

The Living Arts and Culture photographic exhibition and publication is on display in Coonamble and offers a snapshot into the lives of contemporary Aboriginal artists, their towns, villages across outback NSW.

The artists were photographed and interviewed by Andrew Hull who who curates the stories of contemporary Aboriginal artists. The display captures the contribution these artists are currently making to the cultural landscape of our region.

Priscilla's works aim to educate children in Aboriginal art and education. She is derivative of 'dot painting', where she often finds ways to make that relevant to her experience, so the artworks sometimes are a combination of contemporary and traditional styles.

"I'm 'dot mad'. I can just sit for hours and paint my stories using dots – I can get lost in there, and the whole night can go by while I've been working on a painting," she said in thRead More – Source

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Tasmania’s hardstand on unregistered accommodation providers

Accommodation industry bodies hope the state government take a leaf out of Tasmania's book by introducing tougher controls to penalise unregistered accommodation providers and online booking platforms. Earlier this year, Tasmania introduced its Short Stay Accommodation Act 2019 which included measures for online booking platforms to share their data with authorities. The act introduced measures for short stay accommodation providers to display a permit number on their listing and established a data-sharing model with online booking platforms. The model requires online booking platforms to provide government departments with quarterly data to ensure they are complying with requirements, also making it easier to enforce penalties for non-compliance. The data will also provide the government with information to analyse the impacts of short stay accommodation on housing. Registered Accommodation Providers Margaret River Region member Debbie Noonan said the Tasmanian Government's ..

Accommodation industry bodies hope the state government take a leaf out of Tasmania's book by introducing tougher controls to penalise unregistered accommodation providers and online booking platforms. Earlier this year, Tasmania introduced its Short Stay Accommodation Act 2019 which included measures for online booking platforms to share their data with authorities. The act introduced measures for short stay accommodation providers to display a permit number on their listing and established a data-sharing model with online booking platforms. The model requires online booking platforms to provide government departments with quarterly data to ensure they are complying with requirements, also making it easier to enforce penalties for non-compliance. The data will also provide the government with information to analyse the impacts of short stay accommodation on housing. Registered Accommodation Providers Margaret River Region member Debbie Noonan said the Tasmanian Government's legislation was a significant step in the right direction to save the tourism industry in Australia. "We have constantly said, all short term holiday lets should be registered and comply with local planning regulations," she said. "We encourage our state government to act quickly when presented with the recommendations from the enquiry into short term holiday lets, which has recently been conducted here. "We have also called for increased penalties for those properties and booking platforms that fail to comply. "Tasmania has been held up as the "poster child" for Airbnb in this country, but they have realised the oversupply of short term holiday lets causes damage to the tourism industry and brings little benefit. "Long term renters have been evicted in favour of holiday lets, rents have risen for remaining properties, and have become unaffordable for many people resulting in an increase in homelessness. "There has also been negative effects on the wider community with tourism workers losing jobs and many Tasmanians annoyed at having pop-up hotels in their neighbourhoods." Ms Noonan said the flow of online booking platforms had also hurt the economy because accommodation providers lost around 20 cents in the dollar to overseas fees and charges. "As most of these properties are unhosted holiday homes, most of the remaining 80 cents in the dollar is syphoned off to wealthy property investors in other cities or countries," she said. "It has been estimated that half a million dollars a day is being lost from the economy in the Margaret River region alone, so urgent action is needed here. "As tourism and hospitality is the second largest employer in our region, a delay in making the changes needed is likely to cause a recession in the South-West." Australia's peak accommodation industry body, Tourism Accommodation Australia endorsed Tasmania's legislative reforms to tackle unregulated short-stay accommodation. TAA National chief executive officer Michael Johnson said the reforms showed the Tasmanian Government's understanding of the need to address unregulated short-stay accommodation. "The new Tasmanian legislation is arguably the strongest reform we have seen in Australia to date," he said. "It will implement a mandatory registration system which requires planning approval and for Airbnb to only market and sell permitted, registered and approved short-stay accommodation. "In recent years, jurisdictions around the world have moved to strengthen regulations for short-stay accommodation providers and platforms such as Airbnb – finally we are seeing effective measures being adopted here in Australia. "Tasmania has first-hand experience of how unregulated short-stay accommodation negatively impacts housing affordability, community amenity and undermines the licensed accommodation sector, so their reforms have been crafted with this experience in mind." An inquiry into short stay accommodation in WA is currently underway with the Economics and Industry Standing Committee yet to hand down its recommendations to the state government. The inquiry received almost 400 submissions with a large number coming from the South-West.

Accommodation industry bodies hope the state government take a leaf out of Tasmania's book by introducing tougher controls to penalise unregistered accommodation providers and online booking platforms.

Earlier this year, Tasmania introduced its Short Stay Accommodation Act 2019 which included measures for online booking platforms to share their data with authorities.

The act introduced measures for short stay accommodation providers to display a permit number on their listing and established a data-sharing model with online booking platforms.

The model requires online booking platforms to provide government departments with quarterly data to ensure they are complying with requirements, also making it easier to enforce penalties for non-compliance.

The data will also provide the government with information to analyse the impacts of short stay accommodation on housing.

Registered Accommodation Providers Margaret River Region member Debbie Noonan said the Tasmanian Government's legislation was a significant step in the right direction to save the tourism industry in Australia.

"We have constantly said, all short term holiday lets should be registered and comply with local planning regulations," she said.

"We encourage our state government to act quickly when presented with the recommendations from the enquiry into short term holiday lets, which has recently been conducted here.

"We have also called for increased penalties for those properties and booking platforms that fail to comply.

"Tasmania has been held up as the "poster child" for Airbnb in this country, but they have realised the oversupply of short term holiday lets causes damage to the tourism industry and brings little benefit.

"Long term renters have been evicted in favour of holiday lets, rents have risen for remaining properties, aRead More – Source

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‘Disappointing response’ from deputy premier on job losses: Union

HUNDREDS of Essential Energy jobs could still be cut in the Central West and Orana with the deputy premier admitting he has so far been unable to reverse the situation. In early July the government owned energy supplier announced it would axe 182 jobs in regional NSW, a month later a leaked document revealed another 500 would be cut. NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro may have come out in support of the 682 workers set to lose their jobs, but on Thursday he admitted the supplier had not heeded his calls. READ ALSO: NSW abortion inquiry gets 13,000 submissions “After weeks of calling on Essential Energy to pull back on the proposed jobs cuts in regional NSW, I am yet to receive a guarantee from the organisation that they will reverse this decision,” he said. “The NSW Government announced there would be no public sector regional job losses and as a government body, Essential Energy is expected to follow suit. “I have met with Essential Energy and made every effort to discuss this issue wit..

HUNDREDS of Essential Energy jobs could still be cut in the Central West and Orana with the deputy premier admitting he has so far been unable to reverse the situation. In early July the government owned energy supplier announced it would axe 182 jobs in regional NSW, a month later a leaked document revealed another 500 would be cut. NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro may have come out in support of the 682 workers set to lose their jobs, but on Thursday he admitted the supplier had not heeded his calls. READ ALSO: NSW abortion inquiry gets 13,000 submissions "After weeks of calling on Essential Energy to pull back on the proposed jobs cuts in regional NSW, I am yet to receive a guarantee from the organisation that they will reverse this decision," he said. "The NSW Government announced there would be no public sector regional job losses and as a government body, Essential Energy is expected to follow suit. "I have met with Essential Energy and made every effort to discuss this issue with them, however, this state-owned corporation refuses to comply with government policy." The Electrical Trades Union (ETU), which represents many of the workers who will lose their jobs, said it has been left disappointed. ETU secretary Justin Page said he expected firmer action on protecting the jobs of front-line workers across regional NSW. READ ALSO: Virgin gives baggage allowance to infants He accused the National Party of "failing to live up that commitment" of saving Essential Energy workers' jobs. "This lack of progress raises questions about the authority of the Nationals in this government," Mr Page said. "John Barilaro's statement today says that 'this state-owned corporation refuses to comply with government policy' – the Nationals need to toughen up. And the Liberals need to deliver. READ ALSO: Sydney lawyer named as chair-wielding hero "This is simply not acceptable, allowing the Essential Energy CEO to walk over them and defy their policy of protecting jobs. "We are talking about communities doing it tough in the drought and job losses in our regions are just devastating." Why not subscribe.

HUNDREDS of Essential Energy jobs could still be cut in the Central West and Orana with the deputy premier admitting he has so far been unable to reverse the situation.

In early July the government owned energy supplier announced it would axe 182 jobs in regional NSW, a month later a leaked document revealed another 500 would be cut.

NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro may have come out in support of the 682 workers set to lose their jobs, but on Thursday he admitted the supplier had not heeded his calls.

"After weeks of calling on Essential Energy to pull back on the proposed jobs cuts in regional NSW, I am yet to receive a guarantee from the organisation that they will reverse this decision," he said.

"The NSW Government announced there would be no public sector regional job losses and as a government body, Essential Energy is expected to follow suit.

"I have met with Essential EnergRead More – Source

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‘One unexpected emergency, one hiccup, and you’re gone’

DUBBO woman Dawn (not her real name) is only just keeping her head above water. She works three jobs, has an adult son who she financially supports and is among thousands of people in the city who work multiple jobs just to make ends meet. In the Dubbo local government area 5106 people (18.8 per cent of all employed people) work more than one job. This is almost double the state average. READ ALSO: Former deputy Liberal leader Julie Bishop says women need to take up 50 per cent of federal parliamentary seats The numbers are similar in nearby council areas with 17.9 per cent of people working multiple jobs in Narromine and 19.6 per cent of people in Bogan. By comparison, in Bathurst 17.3 per cent of people hold more than one job, while it's 18.2 per cent in Orange. Dawn, who asked for her surname not to be used, works three jobs and said she feels continually stressed trying to make ends meet. “It just keeps my head above water,” she said. Two of her jobs are at one of Dubbo's..

DUBBO woman Dawn (not her real name) is only just keeping her head above water. She works three jobs, has an adult son who she financially supports and is among thousands of people in the city who work multiple jobs just to make ends meet. In the Dubbo local government area 5106 people (18.8 per cent of all employed people) work more than one job. This is almost double the state average. READ ALSO: Former deputy Liberal leader Julie Bishop says women need to take up 50 per cent of federal parliamentary seats The numbers are similar in nearby council areas with 17.9 per cent of people working multiple jobs in Narromine and 19.6 per cent of people in Bogan. By comparison, in Bathurst 17.3 per cent of people hold more than one job, while it's 18.2 per cent in Orange. Dawn, who asked for her surname not to be used, works three jobs and said she feels continually stressed trying to make ends meet. "It just keeps my head above water," she said. Two of her jobs are at one of Dubbo's tourist attractions where she works in guest services, her third job is teaching first aid. "I'm supporting myself and I'm supporting my adult son, who is not living with me, but he has had some significant health issues," she said. TABLE: Story continues below "By the time you pay all your bills and your rent you don't have much left over, you're really struggling then. "You've only got to have one unexpected emergency, one hiccup, and you're gone. It's very stressful." Dawn had a different, higher-paying career 15 years ago, but was medically retired and since then she has struggled. READ ALSO: Sydney CBD stabber accused a 'lone actor' "When you drop a significant amount of money it really puts you behind the eight-ball," she said. "When you're stressed you end up with medical issues and that further complicates things." Dawn said age discrimination may be illegal in NSW, but she believes it still happens. READ ALSO: Charity medical flights a big crash risk "I'm almost at retirement age and for the last five to eight years I've been unable to get a different job," she said. Even though they [employers] aren't allowed to discriminate, they do." Dawn said juggling three jobs is difficult and while she priorities her full-time job she always tries to take on as much work as she can from her two casual positions. "My priority has to be for the full time job, but with the others I go off who may have booked me first," she said.

DUBBO woman Dawn (not her real name) is only just keeping her head above water.

She works three jobs, has an adult son who she financially supports and is among thousands of people in the city who work multiple jobs just to make ends meet.

In the Dubbo local government area 5106 people (18.8 per cent of all employed people) work more than one job. This is almost double the state average.

The numbers are similar in nearby council areas with 17.9 per cent of people working multiple jobs in Narromine and 19.6 per cent of people in Bogan.

By comparison, in Bathurst 17.3 per cent of people hold more than one job, while it's 18.2 per cent in Orange.

Dawn, who asked for her surname not to be used, works three jobs and said she feels continually stressed trying to make ends meet.

You've only got to have one unexpected emergency, one hiccup, and you're gone. It's very stressful.

Dawn, Dubbo worker

"It just keeps my head above water," she said.

Two of her jobs are at one of Dubbo's tourist attractions where she works in guest services, her third job is teaching first aid.

&quoRead More – Source

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